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Bebop Spoken There

Artie Shaw: “I'm not interested in giving people what they want--I'm interested in making music.” – (DownBeat October 15, 1939).

Jason Marsalis: “There's so many places that this music can go and there's a lot yet to be discovered.'” – (DownBeat April 2018)

Today Monday March 19


Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Higher Education & Research Presents: Future Grooves - Sage Gateshead. 12 noon. £5.00. Showcase performances by BMus & BA degree course students feat jazz & non-jazz sets.


Higher Education & Research Presents: Future Grooves - Sage Gateshead. 7:00pm. £5.00. Showcase performances by BMus & BA degree course students feat jazz & non-jazz sets.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Tyneside is set to go Dutch

Pianist Dominic J Marshall leads a mini-invasion of Tyneside by musicians from Amsterdam in late March and early April.
Marshall is no stranger to the local jazz audience, having played a number of enthusiastically received Newcastle gigs beginning when he was a student at Leeds College of Music and leading a trio with fellow Leeds graduates Sam Vicary and Sam Gardner.
Having taken his master’s degree in Amsterdam, Marshall is now resident in the Netherlands, which makes him eligible for the Going Dutch initiative set up by the Jazz Promotion Network in conjunction with Dutch Performing Arts to bring musicians to the UK and Ireland over the next eighteen months. 

Jason Isaacs & the Ambassadors of Swing @ Hoochie Coochie - March 18.

Jason Isaacs (vocal/tenor); Darren Irwin, Mark Webb (trumpets); Dave Brock (trombone); Sue Ferris (alto/flute/clarinet); Alexis Cairns (tenor/clarinet); Stu Collingwood (keys); Neil Harland (bass); Simon Ferry (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Hoochie Coochie was steaming, the snow outside melting, inside, the air was filled with the aromas usually inhaled at Fenwick's cosmetic counters. I'm sure there was some aftershave in there too but, just as it was in the old days at Sinatra, Elvis and Dino gigs, us males were in the minority.
Yup! Jason was back at Hoochie and, as always, the crowd adored him.
He was in good voice - is he ever not? - Wonderwall; Beyond the Sea; Mr Bojangles; Ain't that a Kick in the Head? and Let it Snow had the room buzzing. The band were right behind him booting it along all the way.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

Rare footage of Panama Jazzmen (1952).

Rare vintage photo of the Panama Jazzmen at a dance in 1952. Those jitterbuggin' dancers could certainly cut a caper!

The line-up is Joe McMullin (trumpet); Ronnie McLean (trombone); Stan Martin (clarinet); Norman Rudd (piano); Joe Garner (bass); Teddy Hutchinson (drums) but who is the tenor player?
Note the sound was added later so that what you are hearing isn't what they are playing although it is from a Panama Jazzmen recording..
Could it be Don Armstrong on tenor? Previous posts indicate it might be a bit early for Don.
Comments please.
Thanks to Alan and Steve Rudd for this discovery and editing.

Jonny Deps In Darlo! The Paul Edis Sextet @ OPUS 4 Darlington, March 16.

Adam Sinclair (drums); Mick Shoulder (bass): Chris Hibbard (trombone); Jonny Dunn (trumpet/flugel); Graeme Wilson (tenor/flute);  Paul Edis (piano).
(Review/photos by Jerry)
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, the weather was unspeakable, the music was sublime. Welcome to Opus 4 and an all too rare gig by this sextet. A familiar face (and hat) was missing from the line up with Graham Hardy being replaced by a remembered face (from a gig in Crook in 2014), Jonny Dunn.
The opener, Out of Nowhere, with Jonny Dunn first up to solo, brought appreciative calls of “Yeah!” from the audience. It was the only standard of the evening, the other 12 tunes being originals – one each from Graeme Wilson and Graham Hardy with all the rest composed by the band-leader himself.
Hardy’s, The Pounce was the lively opener to the second set with our dep on first solo again. The piece has a great ending – a feature of many of tonight’s originals. I’m not keen on tunes which seem almost to peter out as though the composer had simply run out of ideas. Here, thanks to the immaculate timing of the musicians almost every tune ended with a snap, a surprise, a flourish. Exclamation marks, not rows of dots! Cue applause!

CD Review: Erin McDougald - Outside the Soiree

Erin McDougald (vocals, bandleader); Dave Liebman (soprano, tenor); Tom Harrell (trumpet, flugelhorn); Mark Sherman (vibes, percussion) Rodney Green; (drums, cymbals); Chembo Corniel (percussion); Rob Block (piano, guitars); Dan Block (alto sax, flute, clarinet); Cliff Schmitt (bass)
(Review by Ann Alex)
‘You’ll like this’ said Lance, and I certainly did. It even has a jazzy version of one of my favourite folk songs as the last track, and big hitter musicians such as Liebman and Harrell on saxes and trumpet. It’s very much our singer’s individual take on a wide range of songs, including a cha cha version of Brother Can You Spare a Dime and a rhythmic 5/4 timing for the ballad Don’t Wait Up For Me. Mostly standards, some lesser known, and one original number, the title track,  from Ms McDougald; Outside The Soiree.

CD Review: Postmodern Jukebox - The New Classics

An essential item for those who caught the phenomenon that is Scott Bradlee's Postmodern Jukebox on their recent UK tour which ended at Southend on March 14, calling in at Sage Gateshead on February 18 with the bonus of an impromptu apres show jam at the Prohibiton Bar which, even at this early date, is fast becoming the stuff of legend. In 10 years time, I guarantee there will be at least several hundred northeasterners who will swear they were present at the tiny Pro Bar on that memorable evening!
However, if you were at neither concert nor jam in person or in your dreams then this disc is no longer an essential - it is now an absolute must!

Saturday, March 17, 2018

EP Review: Alex Hitchcock Quintet - Live at the London & Cambridge Jazz Festivals.

Alex Hitchcock (tenor); James Copus (trumpet/flugel); Will Barry (piano/keys); Joe Downard (bass); Jay Davis (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Comparisions have been made with one of Miles Davis' classic quintets - the one with Wayne Shorter. A comparision that's pretty close. The themes are of that ilk and Hitchcock's tenor is in the Shorter vein whilst, dare I say it? Copus is a more exciting trumpet player than Miles. Admittedly Miles' emotional content may have been higher but for getting the adrenalin flowing, Copus wins hands down. I'm sure anyone who heard the band at the London and Cambridge Jazz Festivals where these were recorded live couldn't fail to agree with me.

Strings in BATH, horns Darlo

Southern (Durham & Darlington) correspondent Tony Eales is happy to report two contrasting but equally successful concerts in a day. Bishop Auckland Town Hall’s monthly lunchtime jazz gig in the basement gallery space drew encouraging numbers to listen to the Giles Strong Trio. Strong, fellow guitarist Roly Veitch and concert series promoter Mick Shoulder, playing double bass, are students of the GASbook and that’s pretty much what they played to an appreciative audience. A few hours later at the Traveller’s Rest in the Cockerton suburb of Darlington one of the key bands working on the regional jazz scene, the Paul Edis Sextet, played to a good turn out. Saxophonist  Graeme Wilson made a round trip from Edinburgh to play the date (that’s real commitment!) and depping trumpeter Jonny Dunn was, according to TE, ‘just great’.  

Good for Jamie Cullum.

On Tuesday night, before his weekly Jazz Show on Radio Two, Jamie said to Simon Mayo that he was paying tribute to Quincy Jones on the eve of his 85th birthday. Mayo asked him about the comments Quincy made about that pop group - you know the one - and his response was “He's Quincy Jones, he can say what he likes” and “Good for him.”
There's been lots of discussion on social media along the lines of what has Quincy Jones ever done for us? Apart from the Jazz, like Dizzy and many others, aside from some of the most memorable theme tunes ever, like Heat of the Night and Ironside, apart from the small matter of Frank Sinatra, aside from the Brothers Johnson, Patti Austin and Benson, apart from Miles' return to the music he made with Gil Evans shortly after his death, what did Q ever do for us to compare to the Beatles?
Ben E king once said that Black America couldn't compete with the Beatles and their haircuts. Maybe if we'd had Michael Jackson.
Q and MJ destroyed them at their own game with Off the Wall and Thriller.
Steve T.

Friday, March 16, 2018

James Harrison Trio @ The Lit & Phil, Newcastle - March 16

James Harrison (piano/drums); Anth Ord (bass guitar); Tom Chapman (drums).
(Review by Lance).
The monthly Friday lunchtime sessions at the Lit and Phil are rapidly becoming an automatic entry into the jazzoholic's diary. As with the Gala lunchtime gigs at Durham, they are invariably sold out. Today's session may not have been totally sold out but, for latecomers, it was standing room only.
When the attraction is the James Harrison Trio, understandably so.
Three young men of talent, they delighted the audience with their brand of piano jazz. Harrison is that rare breed of jazz musician who can be both creative and entertaining at the same time. 

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.