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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Gelly: “From 1 January 1920, when prohibition was imposed in the US, people didn’t stop drinking, they just stopped drinking legally.” – (Jazz Journal October 2017).

Regina Carter: “When I was a teenager, I would daydream about going out on a date and dancing to Ella’s music.” (Down Beat October 2017).

Bebop Spoken Here on hold

As of tonight (November 15) at 21:00 hrs, this site will be temporarily on hold to allow for essential executive maintenance. Some minor activity may be possible during this period and we hope to have normal service resumed as soon as possible.
We apologise for any inconvenience caused.
Lance

Today Thursday November 16

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:00pm. Free.

Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL1 3AD. Tel: 01325 463262. 1:30pm. Free.

Evening.
Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter’s Wheel, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5EE.

Ponyland - Bar Loco, 22 Leazes Park Road, Newcastle NE1 4PG. Tel: 0191 232 5871. 8:30pm. Free.

TBA – Railway, Wellington St., Gateshead. 8pm.

Mary Coughlan - Queen Vic, 78 Victoria Road, South Shields NE33 5PQ. 0191 447 0290. Doors 7:00pm. £18.00 (advance) from The Word (South Shields Library) or by card, tel 0191 427 4597.

Tees Hot Club w. Kevin Eland (trumpet); Donna Hewitt (sax); Graham Thompson (keys) - Dorman’s, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. 9:00pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, September 29, 2017

All Aboard the Durham Music Service Jazz Express!

(Review by Russell)
On 27 September 1825 the world’s first steam locomotive public passenger service opened on the Stockton and Darlington railway. Exactly one hundred and ninety two years later on 27 September 2017 the Durham Music Service Jazz Express celebrated the historic occasion with a jazz concert at Locomotion, National Railway Museum, Shildon.  
Civic dignitaries wearing chains of office took their front row seats to enjoy an evening of big band jazz. Two fantastic bands – Durham Alumni Big Band and Durham County Youth Big Band – were joined by Graeme Robinson’s Locomotive Rhythm project, each band playing one set to a Shildon big band jazz and steam train buff audience. 
Durham Alumni Big Band is comprised of the County Youth Big Band’s former members – the ‘alumni’. The Alumni is an award winning band and there isn’t a weak link in the line-up. Directed by Shaune Eland, the band commissioned composer and trumpeter Matt Roberts, himself a former member of the orchestra, to write a suite of music which would  be Durham Music Service’s contribution to Shildon’s anniversary year. A key element of the  band’s success is the sheer commitment shown by all of the musicians. Some travel many miles to  rehearsal sessions and concert performances, Roberts himself making the journey from London.

The band opened with Invitation featuring Roberts’ train whistle – simple but effective! Ted Heath’s arrangement of Honeysuckle Rose got the dignitaries’ feet tapping as did Bernie’s Tune featuring a five strong trumpet section – the regular hot shot four plus Matt Roberts – and a fiery alto solo from Daniel Johnson. Another number from the Ted Heath pad – Kenny Graham’s King’s Cross Climax – established a tenuous link with the Stockton and Darlington railway celebrations. More choo choo doings in the guise of an updated Chattanooga Choo Choo preceded Robert’s commissioned piece Homeward. The composer spoke of the east coast main line train journey that he often takes – this, in part, the inspiration for the composition, itself one section of The Train suite. Alex Baker on tenor and Jonny Dunn playing flugelhorn excelled, as they so often do. Shaune Eland thanked everyone for their time and commitment, and, by way of an encore, it was all aboard for Tuxedo Junction.

Earlier, Durham County Youth Big Band played a short set. The high standard of musicianship was  to be expected, and, as is the way, several members of the band are moving on. Indeed, some are already studying at university, and, once again, showed their commitment in returning home to play this gig. The band will lose up to six members from across the sections. Vacant chairs will be filled, the next generation is upon us. Earth, Wind and Fire’s Into the Storm whipped up the proverbial as Omar Shade blew gutsy baritone and Sammy Nestico’s Odyssey heard good section work from the trombones. Gut Bucket Blues recalled the late Abram Wilson’s workshop session with the band – trumpeter Matthew Robinson’s rasping solo impressed as did Beth Roberts’ alto saxophone solo.
Roberts featured again on On the Sunny Side of the Street and The Look of Love. The band’s final number was, no less, a world premiere! With Matt Roberts, flugelhorn at the ready, joining the band to play his composition Steamfunk, this was great stuff.

Locomotive Rhythm is Graeme Robinson’s unique project taking as its inspiration the history, toil,  sweat, and nuts and bolts of the region’s railways. A percussion set up incorporating iron and steel parts forged and foraged from the area’s rich industrial past bolted on to present day technologies made for an intriguing listen. Robinson created all manner of clanking rail yard sounds. Joining him on this gig were Kevin Eland, trumpet, Alex Baker, tenor, Gavin Bell, bass, and Chris Rutherford on guitar. The titles of the pieces sought to place the music in the community; familiar places – Myers Flat Battery, Grey Horse (not one, but two local pubs), Hometown and Diesel Multiple Unit. Yes, an ‘industrial’ jazz performance with atmospheric tenor saxophone from Alex Baker and ghostly Miles’ muted horn from an on form Kevin Eland. Locomotive Rhythm is an unusual project. It’s a fair bet that Graeme Robinson is an enthusiast when it comes to the region’s railway heritage.    
   
Durham Alumni Big Band: Shaune Eland MD, Matt Roberts, Ian Robinson, Tom Hill, Jonny Dunn, Matthew Robinson trumpets; David Hamilton, Andrew Kirtley, Terry O’Hern, Alastair Wood trombones; Danielle Drew, Alex Baker, Daniel Johnson, Kirsty Dunn, Omar Shade saxophones; Ben Connor piano, Mick Shoulder bass; Stephen Fletcher drums   

Shildon’s part in the development of the railways cannot be underestimated and Locomotion plays an important role as an invaluable free admission educational resource preserving historic engines and rolling stock for future generations. Visit: www.nrm.org.uk     
Russell

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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