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Bebop Spoken There

Danny Gatton: "I was tired of playing in beer joints. I wanted to do something tangible like building cars. But once you do music it gets into your blood. You can get away from it for awhile but sooner or later it comes back to you." - (Down Beat April 1991).

Tal Farlow: "There were times when I would stop [playing guitar] and do sign painting." - (Downbeat December 5, 1963)

Archives

Today Monday August 21

Radio
Radio 3: Jazz Now. Live from Pizza Express, Soweto Kinch featuring Andy Sheppard/Carla Bley/Steve Swallow. 11pm.
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Afternoon.
Jazz in the Afternoon - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
?????
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Jerry Lewis was Cute!

Yet another entertainer has left us. Following Bruce, Jerry Lewis has now gone. If you want to remember him at his best-and you are also a Count Basie fan - get on to YouTube and type in 'Jerry Lewis does "Cute"' or something similar. It's quite brilliant.
George Hetherington.

CD Review: Power of Peace by the Isley Brothers and Santana.

(Review by Steve T)
 Jazz is an ocean. Rock and roll is a swimming pool. I hang out on a lake. Carlos Santana, Guardian 2000.

(ST: For anybody who doesn't follow such things, when somebody like Carlos talks about rock and roll, he doesn't mean Elvis, Chuck and Little, but boy bands with guitars, generally British, and I'd stick them in a puddle.)

The album combines one of the greatest ever rock bands and one of the greatest ever soul bands, and to extend Carlos' metaphor once more, soul music is a well: it's deep, underground, hard to find, hard to get, but sustains life.
Santana has been very close to Jazz throughout his almost half-century, and has played with Alice Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, Tony Williams, Alphonso Johnson, John McLaughlin and others.
Sadly, the album doesn't live up to its promise, but when you consider these bands peaked between the late sixties and early eighties, perhaps no great surprise.

Paul Edis Trio @ Blaydon Jazz Club - August 20

Paul Edis (piano), Andy Champion (double bass) & Russ Morgan (drums) + Francis Tulip (guitar)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Roly Veitch).

Hello. Is that London’s world-famous jazz club?
Yes. How can I help you?
I know it sold out weeks ago, but, do you have any returns for tonight’s concert?
You’re in luck. We’ve just had a pair of tickets returned to the box office.
Great! I’ll take them.
That’ll be £25 per ticket plus our usual exorbitant booking fee.
That’s fine, it’s worth it to hear the Paul Edis Trio!

Meanwhile, ‘up north’, Blaydon Jazz Club secured the booking of the Paul Edis Trio for a modest fee, and the Black Bull faithful turned out, willingly paying the modest admission charge, knowing they were in for a treat. The trio was in full rehearsal mode long before the audience arrived. New material was to be premiered here on Tyneside, London would have to wait.

Radio Jazz

Mingus at the Proms
(Ed. Apologies for the delay in posting this item from Russell!)
A live edition of Jazz Line-Up comes from George Heriot’s School, Edinburgh at five o’clock today (Saturday August 19). Performers include the Dime Notes, Gwyneth Herbert and the duo of Andy Sheppard and guitarist John Parricelli. Also on Radio 3, Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz (midnight) listens to a selection of Charles Mingus’ recordings. On Thursday of next week (August 24) live from the Royal Albert Hall there is a celebration of Mingus’ life and music with Jules Buckley and the Metropole Orkest and featured soloists Shabaka Hutchings, saxophones, Christian Scott, trumpet, and vocalist Kandace Springs. The broadcast begins at 7:30pm and, twenty-four hours later over on BBC 4, you can listen again and watch the pictures on BBC Proms 2017.
If you want more of Andy Sheppard be sure to tune in to Monday evening’s Jazz Now programme on Radio 3 (11:00pm). Soweto Kinch presents a concert set from the Dean Street Pizza Express Jazz Club featuring Sheppard in his long-standing trio with Carla Bley and Steve Swallow.    
Russell

Sunday, August 20, 2017

CD Review: Julian Costello Quartet - Transitions

Julian Costello (tenor/soprano); Maciek Pysz (guitars); Yuri Goloubev (bass); Adam Teixeira (drums).
(Review by Lance/Drawing by Alban Low).
Thoughtful and compelling, that was my first reaction upon hearing Waves, the opening track. Costello's long drawn out notes convey waves of sound - not to be confused with sheets of the same. His tone is well-rounded, the sound languorous, sonorous, punctuated by a couple of jaunty notes before returning to the serious business in hand. Globe favourite Pycz -  the quartet are there on October 7, put it in your diaries now! - adds his contribution and it's no mere '2 bits' worth. There's no break between Waves and Ducks and I thought the machine was playing tricks when track 2 flashed up.
No, Ducks it was and, although the same ponderous mood was retained, Costello became more expansive, flashing the notes around the way tenor players are expected to do.
Soprano unpacked for Corners - a short opus that revealed Costello's tone to be equally attractive on the higher pitched instrument. Again, no track break - this really is cutting corners.

Mads Mathias - Be sure to catch him.

It was back in 2012 when ace Danish singer, Mads Mathias, released his debut CD Free Falling. For some reason or other, it was 2015 before it got reviewed on BSH. If you read the review you will realise it was well worth the wait and that a new star had been born. Since then I've heard little of Mathias apart from replaying the album many times.
Well, the good news is that he's once more in our midst.
Next weekend he's at the Royal Albert Hall as part of the Clare Teal hosted Prom 2017 -- Swing No End. This is at 1500 hrs on August 27 (live Radio 3?) and televised on BBC Four on Sept. 1 (1930 hrs.)
However, there's a cast of thousands so I doubt if Mads will get more than a couple of numbers.
Fortunately, the great Dane is also appearing in the north (as seen by the south) with a return trip to Seven Arts in Leeds on September 21 and the following day (22) at Scarborough Jazz Festival.
If you've got your fare and just a trifle to spare then don't miss either.
He's also on YouTube.
Lance.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

RIP Sir Bruce Forsyth

The death of Sir Bruce Forsyth, yesterday (August 18), at the age of 89 prompted me to recall that, among his many talents was that of jazz pianist which I think is sufficient for him to earn a mention here. Maybe Brucie wasn't in the Dudley Moore class but, nevertheless. he was a more than competent player as demonstrated in this YouTube clip.
Rest In Peace Sir Bruce, they don't make 'em like you anymore!
Obituary.
Lance.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Preview: Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017

(Preview by Russell)
One week today, at the start of the long August bank holiday weekend, the magnificent Ushaw estate will once again play host to the Ushaw Jazz Festival. Last year’s inaugural event proved beyond doubt that there is a demand for a major festival in County Durham. Jazz fans travelled from all four corners of Britain, with some making the journey from the European continent. This year’s programme is one of quality across three days – Friday 25-Sunday 27 August.
Director of Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017, Paul Edis, has assembled an array of talent beginning on Friday 25 with a performance by the Early Bird Band (6:00pm). In little more than two years, the development of this young ensemble of promising jazz musicians has been quite remarkable. To the credit of the individuals themselves one or two have already moved on to study at prestigious music schools, and this Ushaw appearance is your chance to check out the next generation.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

CD (download) Review: GLOWROGUES - Live at Jazz Plus Presents

Sam Healey (alto); Aaron Dial (trumpet/electronics); Richard Forth (trombone); Ben Watte (keys); Dan Brew (guitar); Jamie Brewster (bass); Jim Molyneux (drums).
(Review by Lance).
After Chris Jones and Charles Price graduated from Durham University, the Uni Big band were left looking for, respectively, a replacement MD/trombonist and a trumpet player. The two musicians had helped the band to win a number of awards and, post graduation, they didn't intend to put music on the backburner as they made their way in the real world.
So they set up a record label - Jazz Plus Productions.
This, their first album [EP] is also the debut release of GLOWROGUES, a Manchester based group of [I quote] phenomenally talented musicians, bringing together jazz, hip hop and funk, with tight horns and serious grooves [end of quote].

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Make a Rendezvous at Durham Cathedral on Saturday night

The Friends of Durham Cathedral have asked me to promote to regular attendees of the Lit & Phil Lunchtime Jazz Concerts the following concert at the Cathedral next Saturday evening, which I am of course more than pleased to do. Details (and Paul Bream’s Jazz Alert write-up) below - and for all of us, whether North East residents or just citizens of the world, a very worthy cause. 
For those with long(er) memories, it is a welcome return - after Stan Tracey's Ellington Sacred Concerts in the nineties - of jazz and gospel to the Cathedral. It sounds like it will be a truly memorable evening. Please come and make it also a successful one for the Cathedral Friends.
Brian Ebbatson

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Key Moments 4

(By Russell).
The first four LPs borrowed from a local record lending library; Be Bop Preservation Society Be Bop Preservation Society (with colourful zoot suits on the LP cover), Billie Holiday Songs for Distingué Lovers, Miles Davis Bitches Brew (a starting point, working back over to the Birth of the Cool era), Quintette du Hot Club de France Swing ’35-’39.
Michael Parkinson’s late night chat show. Parky, a life-long jazz fan, had a front row seat as jazz greats performed a tune or two in the studio; Oscar, Ella, Joe Pass, Dudley Moore. Yes, little Dud, a seriously good pianist, Errol Garner a favourite. Errol who? Must check him out.

Book Review: Trevor Barre - Convergences, Divergences & Affinities (Compass Publishing 2017)

Not being over-familiar with the genre, free improvisation, it would be unfair of me to pass judgement on this well-written and equally well-researched historical treatise. Nevertheless, before moving on to the Press Release, I will make a few observations. Steve Beresford claims that Free Improv. is not jazz...some of it sounds like jazz but they're not playing it. This equates with what Charlie Parker said about Bebop, that it's not jazz. This has, forever, been the problem with any new art form and music in particular. The listener judges the 'new thing' using the values of its predecessor. Neither better nor worse, the key word is 'different'.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Matt MacKellar Trio with Julija Jacenaite @ Empty Shop - August 13

Joel Brown (keyboards), Paul Grainger (double bass) & Matt MacKellar (drums) with Julija Jacenaite (vocals)
(Review by Russell)
A mid-August late Sunday afternoon gig at Durham’s Empty Shop. Would anyone show up? The first floor speakeasy with its paint-splattered mix and match tables and chairs, floorboards and a minimalist lighting rig, slowly but surely filled up with a mix and match audience of regulars, jazz musicians (established and emerging) and first time visitors. The band, fronted by vocalist Julija Jacenaite, made a first visit to Durham, and in so doing said farewell to a young man destined to perform at the world’s great jazz venues.

Key Moments 3

(By Ann Alex)
I didn’t come into jazz until after the age of 50 or so. Making me a very late entrant, which I regret.
Childhood age 7 to 11 - Heard loads of the jazz standards on the radio, picked up lots of the lyrics but didn’t like the songs much, nor did I understand the love songs. I did enjoy Hard Hearted Hannah as I loved the image of her ‘pouring water on a drowning man’. Children are cruel!  
Teenage years – liked listening to Brubeck’s Take 5, Kenny Ball and Acker Bilk. Considered Ella Fitzgerald to be a ‘good singer’, but, really, preferred classical singers.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Preview: Indigo Jazz Voices @ The Globe: August 17

 Don’t miss the chance to hear these singers at their latest gig this coming Thursday 17.
Jen Errington, Jenny Lingham, Carrie McCullock, Barry Keatings and newcomer Indigo singer Miriam McCormick will all be performing individually, five very different voices, five unique talents.
You’ll be able to listen to classic songs such as I’ve Got You under My Skin; Blue Moon; Angel Eyes;
Come Rain Or Come Shine; and You’ve Changed.
The vocalists will be accompanied by fine musicians Alan Law on piano and Katy Trigger on bass, with Ron Pattinson on piano for Barry’s vocals. It’s a 7.30pm start, and £5 admission – well worth the money.
Ann Alex

CD Review: Tom Millar Quartet - Unnatural Events

Tom Millar (piano); Alex Munk (guitar/electric sitar on title track)); Misha Mullov-Abbado (bass); Mike Clowes (drums) + Alice Zawadski (voice on 2 tracks)
(Review by Lance).
Millar, born in Sydney, raised in London, read music at Cambridge, graduated with a master's from RAM and studied with Django Bates in Switzerland before recording this, his debut CD, in Wales. Not a man to let the grass grow under his feet! Fortunately, this, seemingly perpetual motion, is reflected in his playing and in his compositions which are all inspired by people and places that have been important to him.
Azura Days has Millar and MM-A providing extra rhythm behind Munk by way of some egg shaking. Clowes thumps the tubs behind Millar's solo and the whole is suggestive of JSB after a few Brandenburgs and Kronenbourgs although, in actual fact, it was inspired by a trip around the Mediterranean.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Francis Tulip Quartet (aka Tulip Connection) @ Bar Tutsters, Bishop Auckland, August 10.

Francis Tulip (guitar), Joel Brown (keys), Michael Dunlop (bass), Matthew MacKellar (drums).
(Review by Steve T.)
The young lions of North East Jazz continue their triumphant run towards world domination. With less than a week to promote, the hordes were never going to turn out on a Thursday night in Bishop Auckland. Nevertheless, it was still pretty busy, including some local music luminaries and some local young musicians threatening to put their instruments on eBay.
Tutsters’ landlord, Mick McPherson, has tried his hand at Jazz before with a Tuesday night jam session featuring banjos, cornets, clarinets and, on occasion, a certain guitarist, so all credit to him for having a go.
Much of the Monk stuff featured at the Globe was stepped aside to make way for Wayne and Trane which the guitarist plans to feature with his Birmingham Conservatoire Quartet at Ushaw Jazz Festival in a couple of weeks’ time.

Me Tarzan, you Jane, he’s Joel Brown

The 2017 Whitley Bay Film Festival is working in partnership with the Tyne Theatre and Opera House to celebrate ‘The Cinema Years’ of the listed former cinema on Westgate Road. A Stoll cinema for more than fifty years up until 1974, many blockbusters were screened with queues snaking around the block such was its popularity with film goers. Now, over three days, cinema buffs are rolling up to the Tyne Theatre to watch films originally screened way back when, view exhibition material, participate in workshops and partake of a ‘dainty tea’ as was the custom.
Friday’s opening event presented Tarzan of the Apes (Dir. Scott Sidney, 1918). Black and white, silent, with live piano accompaniment. Our pianist? Joel Tofield Brown. Yes, the very same Joel   Brown who has made a big impression at the Jazz Café’s regular jam sessions! Tarzan, played by
Elmo Lincoln, could never have imagined piano accompaniment like this! Joel, at seventeen, played it his way…jazz piano all the way. Improvising to the moving image, Joel’s interpretation of the on-screen action maintained audience interest throughout. One hour’s worth of piano, the concentration required no doubt a real challenge, Joel Brown did a grand job. Oh, yeah…Tarzan got his girl. 
Russell.

Stu Collingwood Trio @ The Globe August 10

Mo Scott (vocals) Stu Collingwood (organ); Lloyd Howell (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex/Photo from Jazz Coop archive)
This was advertised as a duo, but Mo came along as well, I’m pleased to say. I encountered Mo many years ago as a blues singer but she’s always been familiar with standard jazz songs, and she excelled with the Gasbook last night, giving a rather more raunchy style of interpretation than is usual. Stu explained to me that his organ/keyboard needed only a light touch to play multiple notes very fast, but maybe he was being modest as his fingers flew over the keys and chords like forked lightning, and his feet danced on the pedals, entrancing to watch. And the drummer held all the rhythms together like the master that he is.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Zoe Gilby & Andy Champion @ The Jazz Cafe - August 4

Zoe Gilby (vocals) & Andy Champion (double bass).
(Review by JC/Photos  from archives courtesy of Mike Tilley .)
I very rarely come into the centre of Newcastle at weekends except to go to a jazz gig, usually at the Jazz Cafe, as it is often a slightly alarming experience. In the old days jazz used be wild music associated with illicit substances and unbridled sexual licence and decent law abiding citizens would not be associated with it. Now it's the other way round with the Jazz Cafe being a haven of tranquillity and sensible shoes with the drugs and sex mostly just in the songs, while outside in the city centre the streets around are like something out of one of Fellini's films. Noisy gangs of young men and equally voluble groups of young women fill the pavements and the roads. No children or families, of course, or anyone over 30 - except for a solitary jazz fan in appropriate footwear heading swiftly for Pink Lane.

Identity Parade

This photo is of a session that took place at the Rising Sun pub, Wallsend, in April 1981. 
Pictureed (left to right) are: Ian Stronach (guitar); Tony Coe (looking out of the window); John Stevens (drums); unknown trumpet and bass guitar; Ian Carr (flugel); Unknown keyboard player.
John Etheridge was present (guitar headstock to the left of the picture) also Nigel and Germaine Stanger and, no doubt, others.
Can anyone help me identify the three unknowns and how they came to be playing at the Rising Sun?
Lance.

All-Party Parliamentary Jazz Awards - only 5 days left to vote!

With the opinion polls giving Bebop Spoken Here a 2 point lead (in my dreams!) in the All Party  Parliamentary Jazz Awards [Media Section] now is the time for those of you who care about Jazz in our area - the north east of England - to cast your all-important vote. The polls close on August 16 at noon.
To vote please go to: 
PLEASE NOTE CRITERIA FOR THE DIFFERENT CATEGORIES:

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Single Review: Bunny Sigler - Angel Eyes

We don't normally review singles as let's face it, jazz people rarely release singles these days. However, this version of that old late night barroom classic, Angel Eyes, by Philadelphia R & B singer Bunny Sigler, kind of hits the spot the way a straight Jack Daniels hits an empty stomach. Oh, and, the promo video is great with lots of 30s/40s black and white images of NYC streets and night clubs.
Angel Eyes is actually part of a soon to be released album appropriately titled Young at Heart. The single's available via the usual suspects from August 18
Lance.

Lily Veitch Funeral Arrangements

The service is at Mountsett Crematorium Tues 15th Aug at 2.45pm.
Afterwards, friends meet at the Black Bull, Blaydon for a celebration of Lily's life.
Mountsett Crematorium, Dipton, is on the A692 road that runs from Whickham through Sunniside and eventually on to Consett.
If unable to get to Mountsett, friends are very welcome to come along and join us at The Black Bull from 4.15pm. 
Family flowers only. There will be a collection at Mountsett and donations at the Black Bull for Dementia care.
Roly.

Jazz Quest Radio "What Laurie [Pepper] Likes"

Listen to recordings of Art Pepper along with studio guests, Art's widow, Laurie Pepper and Belgium archivist Rocco Bertels. It's compelling listening. Both the talking and the music is great. Art's my all-time favourite alto player - maybe even my favourite jazz musician ever and it's a thrill for me to hear Laurie talking about the background to many of Art's recordings. 

Wednesday, August 09, 2017

On the Down Beat: Wadada bags a hat-trick, Women clean up

(Report by Russell)
The 65th Annual Down Beat International Critics’ Poll results have been published in the August issue of Down Beat magazine. Veteran trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith has secured a late-career triple award - Jazz Artist, Trumpeter of the Year and Jazz Album of the Year (America’s National Parks). Female Vocalist of the Year is Cécile McLorin Salvant, and Male Vocalist of the Year is Gregory Porter.
The Down Beat categories are all but endless. Take a look at the following selective list. Spot the common denominator of these award winners…

Jazz Co-op Workshop @ The Globe: August 5/6

Tutors: Jilly Jarman and Jim Birkett
(Report by Ann Alex)
This is an account of what 22, or so, of us got up to at this very enjoyable and informative event. As Jim said, music is PLAYED so it should be done for enjoyment, which was what we had. We began with a plenary session of practising rhythms and pitches, singing notes 1, 3, and 5 of the scale, and clapping rhythms with eyes closed. DO try this at home and you’ll find out how difficult it is for everyone to clap correctly at the same time. Much laughter. We then became 2 groups, more advanced people upstairs with Jim doing goodness knows what heavy theory and 4 vocalists downstairs with Jilly and 2 keyboards, 4 saxes, drums and also some of the instrumentalists singing. A very unusual jazz combo indeed, and Jilly on bass guitar and keyboard.

Farewell to Glen Campbell and Barbara Cook.














The lights will be dimmed in Nashville and on Broadway tonight in tribute to the passing of two legends from two very different genres who both died yesterday (August 8)
Glen Campbell is best remembered for his hits from the 1970's that included Wichita Lineman, Galveston, By the Time I Get to Phoenix and Rhinestone Cowboy. Country songs that were as comfortable in the pop charts of the day as they were on Grand Ol' Opry. As well as being a fine country singer, Campbell was no mean guitarist - you had to be in Nashville - and he played guitar on Sinatra's Strangers in the Night. Like yesterday's other departure, Campbell also struggled with alcohol (and drug) problems but he overcame them and they haven't tarnished his memory.

CD Review: Huk's Eleven - Rescued From the Drawer.

(Review by Lance)
I'm 'winging' this one as the notes are in German - the language spoken in the Interlaken area of Switzerland where this band is based.
It would seem that Krähenbühl wrote these charts some years ago before consigning them to a drawer where they lay gathering dust until, earlier this year, he rescued them, hence the title.
They were well worth the rescuing. Imaginative arrangements of standards that swing comfortably, punctuated with splendid solos throughout. I'm not always sure which of the two tenors solo on what. It doesn't matter, they tick the Ducal boxes - do wah do wah do wah.

Tuesday, August 08, 2017

Gig Preview: The Tulip Connection @ Bar Tutsters, Bishop Auckland - Thursday, August 10

This one came in just after the landlord of Bar Tutsters had returned from his holidays. He feared the name, the Francis Tulip Quartet, might put his regulars off, so he renamed them the Tulip Connection.
Readers of BSH aren't put off by Quartets being called Quartets and this is the same group who've drawn rave responses at Newcastle’s Jazz Caff and the Jazz Co-op HQ at the Globe [picture] recently.
With drummer Matthew MacKellar heading off to Berklee in a week’s time, Francis heading back to Birmingham Conservatoire, bass ace Michael Dunlop going back to the Guildhall and Joel Brown back to - would you believe? – school, this will be your last chance to hear the band before Christmas.
Steve T.
Thursday August 10: Bar Tutsters, 37 Forebondgate, Bishop Auckland DL14 7PE. 8pm. Free.

Monday, August 07, 2017

CD Review: Introducing Gabriel Latchin Trio

Gabriel Latchin (piano); Tom Farmer (bass); Josh Morrison (drums).
(Review by Lance).
They knew what they [Alys Jazz] were doing when they sent me this magic circle. From the opening measure, I was spellbound. A first call sideman, Latchin decided, in his own words, that it was time for him to step out of the shadows. After this debut, 120mm diameter piece of artistry, it's surely goodbye shadows.
A ravishing mix of originals and standards shows the Guildhall graduate to be as dexterous as any of today's piano-men and quite a few of yesterday's too. But it's not just the spectacular dashes around the 88s that slay me, it's also the choice of chords. Big fat juicy ones like we used to associate with Shearing, Peterson, Nat Cole, Garner, and Bud Powell. Latchin's harmonic scope is on a par with those worthys and no doubt many others who have influenced him along the way. Cedar Walton was one of those and Latchin pays tribute saying he should have retitled If I Only Had a Brain to If I Only Had Cedar's Brain! He's doing pretty damn good with the brain he's got thank you very much!

Newcastle Festival of Jazz and Improvised Music 2017 Thursday 28th September - Sunday 1st October.

In 1995 the old Newcastle Jazz Festival closed its doors, leaving a void in the city. Now, in celebration of the milestone 100th anniversary year of the first ever jazz recordings, it’s the perfect time to bring together and recognise some of the great venues and promoters working in the North East for the first 'Newcastle Festival of Jazz and Improvised Music'.
Alongside some of the cream of regional players, the festival is pleased to welcome European musicians from France, Denmark and Switzerland, as well as some of the UK's most exciting improvisers from the Glasgow and London scenes. Many thanks to all the promoters, venues and musicians, pulling together to make this such a great programme of events, and we gratefully acknowledge The Arts Council of England and Performing Rights Society Foundation for their financial support.
Wesley Stephenson - Festival Producer.
www.facebook.com/newcastlefestivalofjazzandimprovisedmusic.
info@jazznortheast.com www.jazznortheast.com #jazz100

Sunday, August 06, 2017

CD Review: John Vanore and his All-Star Large Ensemble - Stolen Moments, Celebrating Oliver Nelson

(Review by David Brownlow)
A fine CD by John Vanore leading a 15 piece jazz orchestra honouring the works of his former tutor - composer/arranger, Oliver Nelson who sadly passed away in 1975. Nine pieces originally composed or arranged by Nelson which Vanore has reimagined, rearranged, played trumpet on or conducted this strong material. The line-up is unusual in that there are two French horns, two trombones, four/five trumpets, two saxes who double, and five in the rhythm dept. The arrangements are freshly crafted in the ‘contemporary’ big band/orchestra style and the results are dynamic and full of surprises - well worth hearing.

Francis Tulip Quartet: Monk’s Mood @ The Globe - August 5

Francis Tulip (guitar), Joel Brown (piano), Michael Dunlop (bass) & Matthew MacKellar (drums)
(Review by Russell/photos courtesy of Steve T)
Along the road at Times Square (NCL not NYC) the Manic Street Preachers pitched a tent. Here at the Globe, the Jazz Co-op was having a busy old time. Day one of a two-day weekend workshop at the Railway Street premises utilised the ground floor bar and first-floor music room. As participants departed at the end of an informative first day, in walked a Tulip.
The Francis Tulip Quartet walked in…set-up, tune-up, run through, ready to go. The FTQ departed, as does any self-respecting band, in search of that pre-gig essential, fast food. Meanwhile, the FTQ fan club arrived. The hordes arrived just in time (there’s a tune in there somewhere) to see the last Red Kite depart for the sanctuary of Derwent Valley. Yes, Wylam Brewery’s ever-popular beer was no more. An Angel (another in Wylam’s portfolio) came to the rescue. Front row seats bagged (set at a distance from the stage), lights dimmed, the Globe was in a Monk’s Mood.

Saturday, August 05, 2017

Rendezvous in Durham Cathedral

Our 'Friend in jazz', John Taylor, drew my attention to this Northern Echo item re a forthcoming jazz concert by Rendezvous Jazz in Durham Cathedral on Saturday, August 19.
Rendezvous Jazz can also be heard every Friday lunchtime at the Black Horse in Monkseaton.
For further details of the Cathedral gig see poster in
RH column of BSH.
Lance.

CD Review: The Dime Notes.

Andrew Oliver (piano); David Hornblow (clarinet); Dave Kelbie (guitar); Tom Wheatley (bass).
(Review by Lance).
A little gem showcasing early jazz whilst drawing it to the attention of present-day listeners. Four mature players, yet still too young to have been accorded venerable status although, in a blindfold test, I think they would have been.
The influences are the New Orleans of Evan Christopher, who wrote the album notes, and early New York jazz. Jelly Roll and Bechet are well represented in the repertoire alongside Handy, Boyd Senter and, among others, pianist Oliver who composed Otis Stomp inspired by a small town in his native Oregon.

Big Muddy @ the Prohibition Bar - August 4

John Haylock (baritone); Gordon Brown (alto, clarinet, vocals); Nigel Robson (trombone); Lionel Hehir (guitar); Stu Halliday (drums); Dave Weisser (cornet, vocals); Jude Murphy (bass guitar, vocals).
(Review by John T.)
Why have I not heard this band before? I’ve been following Dave Weisser’s Take it to the Bridge for many years and did not know he worked with other outfits! 
Big Muddy are well rehearsed and have a balanced line-up. Above all else, they really do SWING – not just good readers!! The well thought out programme at the Prohibition had a range of styles and influences:-

Jazz Stars Head to Ilkley

(Press release).
Ilkley Jazz Festival, now in its fourth year, starts Wednesday 16th August and is bigger and better than ever with more acts and headlining International Jazz stars from London as well as the very best of Northern and Yorkshire jazz talent.
Headlining on Friday 18th at the Winter Gardens, Ilkley, with his latest album ‘Theory of Joy’ is International Jazz vocalist Ian Shaw, often compared with Kurt Elling and Mark Murphy and recently nominated in the prestigious Downbeat Magazine jazz poll as best vocalist. 


Friday, August 04, 2017

Secret Voice of Hollywood (Nixon dubs Nixon dubbing Hepburn!)

Back in the day when lavish Hollywood musicals filled the screens of cinemas worldwide and, of course, the box office, the producers and casting directors were faced with a problem. How do you cast a megastar, a guaranteed money spinner, in a musical when the star can't sing? No problem with Doris Day, Judy Garland, Kathryn Grayson, Jane Powell or Julie Andrews - they could sing and they could act. Deborah Kerr couldn't sing but she could act the pants off most of her peers. Likewise Audrey Hepburn.
Enter Marni Nixon.
Marni, who died last year aged 86, provided Kerr's singing voice in The King and I and Hepburn's voice in My Fair Lady. In West Side Story she ghosted Natalie Wood's voice without Natalie knowing the voice wasn't her own!

Redemption found in Empty Shop - August 3

(Photo from archives)
Durham correspondent Tony Eales reports a standing room only attendance at the Empty Shop for the return visit of Tyneside based quartet Redemption. An evening of original numbers and modern jazz standards entertained a crowd of students (yes, some stay on during the summer months) and regular jazz gig-goers. John Hall and co played their tune dedicated to Bebop Spoken Here’s editor – the one titled Free Lance, thus making make this ‘in absentia’ performance a contender for Gig of the Year!
The Steam Machine Brewing Company has established a summer-long ‘tap takeover’ at the Empty Shop and the next opportunity for jazz fans to sample the Newton Aycliffe brewery’s ‘product’ is on Sunday week (August 13) when Matt MacKellar’s Trio invites the dynamic Julija Jacenaite to sing a bluesy tune or two. It’s a four o’clock start, and the gig is heartily recommended. 
Russell.                  

Ella & Dizzy @ The Proms tonight on BBC4

The Jazz Promenaders are in for a treat tonight - Roll Over Beethoven, make room for Ella and Diz.
Tonight's concert from the Royal Albert Hall is a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie with Dianne Reeves [pictured] playing Ella and the amazing James Morrison the role of Dizzy. 
With this being the centennial for both it is fitting that such an accolade is accorded at such a prestigious event as The Proms. I hope it isn't watered down too much to accommodate the traditional Promgoer.
The down beat is at 8 pm on BBC4 so, Mister Paganini...
Lance

Situations Vacant

"Jazz North East – Trustee (unpaid) 
Jazz North East is the longest established promoter of Jazz in the UK, with 2016 having seen us celebrate 50 years of bringing the best contemporary jazz to Tyneside. But for us this anniversary was just the launchpad for the future. We’re much more interested in looking forward to our future concert programmes, with diversity very much at the heart of our approach. 
As a registered charity and company limited by guarantee, our activities are managed by a Board of Trustees, who play a crucial role in making sure the organisation manages its funds properly and fulfils its role of promoting gigs that showcase the best of British and international jazz.

Parliamentary Jazz Awards 2017

Voting is now open for the 2017 Parliamentary Jazz Awards, which will take place at PizzaExpress Live Holborn on Tuesday 10th October. Entries are open to anyone with the final deadline for entries set for 12 noon on Wednesday 16th August 2017. 

To vote please go 
to: 
PLEASE NOTE CRITERIA FOR THE DIFFERENT CATEGORIES:
Jazz Album of the Year (released in 2016 by a UK band or musicians)
Services to Jazz Award (to a living person for their outstanding contribution to jazz in the UK). 
Jazz Newcomer of the Year (UK-based artist, musician or group with a debut album released in 2016)
Jazz Education Award (to an educator or project for raising the standard of jazz education in the UK)
Jazz Media Award(including broadcasters, journalists, magazines, blogs, listings and books)
Jazz Venue of the Year (including jazz clubs, venues, festivals and promoters)
Jazz Ensemble of the Year(UK-based group who impressed in 2016)
Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year (UK-based musician who impressed in 2016)
Jazz Vocalist of the Year (UK-based vocalist who impressed in 2016
To vote please go tohttps://www.pizzaexpresslive.com/parliamentary-jazz-awards-2017

The awards are organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), co-chaired by Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn, and supported by Pizza Express Live in conjunction with Peroni.
(Editor: As ever, we at BSH hope our readers will give us their consideration when weighing up the form in the Jazz Media Award category.)

Thursday, August 03, 2017

RIP Lily Veitch












It is my sad duty to report the passing today (August 3) of Lily Veitch, mother of well-known guitarist Roly Veitch, the organiser of Blaydon Jazz Club.
Lily was an enthusiastic supporter of the music and frequently accompanied Roly to concerts and gigs, particularly those held at the various venues in the town where Blaydon Jazz Club was encamped.
Always a keen dancer, the young Lily is 3rd from the left in the photo of the dancing troupe she was part of. The more recent photo was taken, with Roly, at the celebration of her 90th birthday.
Our condolences go out to Roly, Christine and all the family as well as to those of us who will miss a lovely lady.
Lily Veitch was 96, sadly missed, may she Rest In Peace.
Lance.
PS: Funeral arrangements will be announced in due course.

JOE THOMAS: Jazz Legend, Icon, The Ebony Godfather, passes away at age 84 on July 26, 2017

(Press release by Jazz Promo Services)
The musical career of The Incomparable Joe Thomas spans over seven decades. During that time, he performed throughout the world, gaining notoriety, acclaim and adoration internationally.Joseph Samuel Thomas was born to Frank Thomas and Sarah Pryor Thomas on May 31, 1933 in Newark, New Jersey. Born with extraordinary musical talents, Joe was blessed by God with the gifts of the spoken and written word.

Jazz FM – Move On Up*

(Press release)
Jazz FM has increased weekly reach to 556,000, up 19% quarter on quarter, with total hours unchanged at 1,660,000.
Listening across the UK has grown at twice the rate as in London with 56% of listeners living outside the London area compared with under 40% in Q1 2016 before Jazz FM re-launched nationally on DAB+ over a year ago. 
The weekly audience is slightly male biased at 52%, with two-thirds of listeners aged 15-54.  The audience profile has continued to skew younger with 15-34’s now representing 37% of weekly reach.

Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Jo Harrop @ the Gala Studio, Friday July 28

(Review & photos by Brian Ebbatson/Collage by Lance).
The Park and Ride bus at Sniperley pulled away without Jo as she was helping some European visitors buy tickets, but this was the only mishap of the day. Jo still arrived well in time to quickly rehearse the one number not on the programme with fellow musicians Paul Edis on piano, Andy Champion on double bass and Russ Morgan on drums, before taking a quick break as the Gala Studio filled up in anticipation of some sparkling summer afternoon jazz.
“Jo Harrop is a young jazz singer with a rich, captivating voice, who takes on classic jazz standards with ease” is how the Royal Albert Hall website describes Jo. Such is the range of her repertoire,
Jordi Jo (as she’s been known since her student days) only repeated two numbers from the previous gigs. Hearing familiar, less familiar, and one new number we were treated to yet another outstanding hour of music.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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