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Bebop Spoken There

Buddy Rich: "You either swing a band or you don't swing a band - (Metronome April 1956).

Sinclair Traill: “Well I don't think he (Chet Baker) can sing either.” – (Jazz Journal August 1956).

Fred Rowe Funeral Arrangements

The funeral of well-respected and much-loved trumpet player Fred Rowe will take place on Wednesday, December 13 at 14:00 hrs: Lytham Crematorium (Regent Ave, Lytham Saint Annes FY8 4AB). Afterwards - All warmly welcome for refreshments at 2 Chapel Close, Wesham, Preston PR4 3HB.
No flowers by request donations to Parkinson's UK. Should you wish to donate to Parkinson’s research, please contact the Funeral Directors (J & A Porter Funeral Services, Windsor Court, Windsor Road, Ansdell, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire FY8 1AH. Tel: 01253735423) or place in a collection box that will be provided at the end of the service.
"Please do come along, we would love to see as many of Fred’s friends as possible" - Joan Rowe and family.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance

Today Sunday December 10

Afternoon.

Musicians Unlimited - Park Hotel, Park Rd., Hartlepool TS26 9HU. 01249 233126.1pm. Free.

Blues @ The Bay - Tanner Smith's, 17-19 South Parade, Whitley Bay NE26 2RE, 0191 2525941. 4pm. Blues Jam w. Scott Wall & Charlie Philp.

Somethin' Blue - Vesuvio, 3a Houndgate, Darlington DL1 5RL. 01325 788564. 5pm. Weekly.
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Evening

Blue Jazz Sextet - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.

Article XI & Favourite Animals - Bridge Hotel, Castle Garth, Newcastle NE1 1RQ. 8pm. £8 (£6 conc.) JNE.

Classic Swing - The Kittiwake, Claremont Crescent, Whitley Bay NE26 3HL. Tel: 0191 251 3977. 6:00pm. New weekly residency.

Durham Alumni Big Band + Durham County Youth Big Band - The Keys, Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. Tel: 01325 394222. 6:00pm. £6.00. Note change of venue.

Jazz Jam - Empty Shop, 35c Framwellgate Bridge, Durham DH1 4SJ. 7:30pm. Last one of 2017

Chris Martin & Scott Wainwright - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

CD Review: Leo Richardson Quartet - The Chase

Leo Richardson (tenor); Rick Simpson (piano); Mark Lewandowski (bass); Ed Richardson (drums) + Quintin Collins trumpet on 3 tracks) ; Alan Skidmore (tenor on 1 track).
(Review by Lance).
Still early days but, when I heard this album my immediate thought was that all bets are off regarding the CD of the Year. I double checked - had I put on a Dexter Gordon CD by mistake? No this wasn't the great Dex - none of those amusing quotes that gradually become annoying!
Nothing to annoy here. Just pleasure of the kind that Dexter gave in between the quotes. Leo is the most exciting tenor saxist that I've heard since Simon Spillett arrived on the scene. This is hard bop Blue Note as it was when I were a lad. Think Jazz Messengers and, if you were on Tyneside in the early '60s, the Emcee Five.

Paul Edis and Graeme Wilson @ Jazz Lounge, Ushaw College, Durham, August 26















Paul Edis (piano), Graeme Wilson (saxophone).
(Review by Steve T/Photos courtesy of John Cogan)
I recently said people like the idea of (oddball soul singer) Swamp Dogg, Sun Ra, Captain Beefheart and Tom Waites as much as the music and Thelonious Monk may just be the ultimate example of this.
I've been listening to Monk for years but still don't get it, though I have no plans to give up. I even asked local legend Dennis, something of an authority on Coleman Hawkins, thinking I might be able to use that as a route in.
I missed Edis and Wilson’s legendary Caff performance, or should I say I was forbidden to go, so this was a big deal for me. At the interval, Russell, who is a Monk man, said it was the easiest review ever - perfect - though it won't surprise him to find out I disagree; but only a little.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

That "funky feel" at this year’s Chapel Allerton Leeds Village Jazz Festival 1-3 September

(Press Release).
The Chapel Allerton Village Jazz Festival in Leeds gets underway this weekend starting Friday 1st September and running through to Sunday 3rd September. Dazzling jazz sax player Dave O'Higgins will headline, with a special performance with material from his latest album, "It's Always 9.30 in Zog" at Seven Arts on Saturday 2nd September. "He plays with quite exceptional fluency and his fund of ideas never runs out" - Observer. His band will also be giving a masterclass before the concert.

More photos from Ushaw.


There were almost as many, I'm told, photographers in attendance at the recent Ushaw Durham Jazz Festival as there were musicians. Like most festivals, at times it seems as if the snappers outnumber the blowers. A subject that has often caused a degree of controversy as to should they or shouldn't they be allowed.
John Cogan, a recent contributor to BSH sent a number of high-quality pictures that I felt were deserving of an individual gallery of their own.
Lance.

Buck Clayton Legacy Band and Lady J @ Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017 - August 26














Alan Barnes (alto saxophone & clarinet), Dean Masser (tenor saxophone), Ian Smith (trumpet), Ian Bateman (trombone), JJ Vinton (piano), Alyn Shipton (double bass), Bobby Worth (drums) & Lady J (vocals)
(Review/photos courtesy of Russell)
The legendary, the erudite, the virtuosic, put them together and you’ve got yourself a headline act. Alyn Shipton travelled north with his renowned Buck Clayton Legacy Band, and for good measure, Lady J, to play the set piece concert at this year’s Ushaw Jazz Festival. A programme associated with Buck Clayton and Billie Holiday, performed by some of the best in the business, drew a large crowd to Ushaw’s imposing Exhibition Hall.

Francis Tulip Band @ Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017 - August 26

Francis Tulip (guitar), Will Markham (piano), Tommy Fuller (bass) & Kai Charaeunsy (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Brian Ebbatson)
Francis Tulip returned to the region bringing with him three of his fellow Birmingham Conservatoire undergraduate music degree students to play a one hour set on day two at this year’s Ushaw Jazz Festival. Guitarist Tulip first turned heads as a member of the Early Birds based at the Lit and Phil in Newcastle, sitting-in at jam sessions, and subsequently working with the likes of Alan Barnes on jazz club dates – all this before commencing his studies in England’s second city!

Emma Fisk & James Birkett @ Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017 - August 26

Emma Fisk (violin) & James Birkett (guitar)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of John Cogan.)
Ushaw is at its best on a summer’s day. The house and grounds open to the public, the greenery, flowers in full bloom, what more could anyone ask? A jazz festival, that’s what! The ‘jazz lounge’, aka the Francis Thompson Room, with its numerous Chesterfields, potted plants, and bar counter groaning under the weight of sumptuous, tempting cakes, someone knew this Saturday afternoon that those leather sofas should be occupied well in advance of the one o’clock start of an eagerly awaited concert.

CD Review: Joe Turner - Smashing Thirds

Joe Turner (piano/vocal); Hans Rettenbacher (bass); Stu Martin (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Breda Jazz Festival 1982 was a vintage year. Apart from the Saratoga Jazzmen and the River City Jazzmen, both bands from Tyneside, the Dutch also welcomed Bob Wilber, Warren Vaché, Guy Lafitte and Joe Turner.
Not the blues singer Big Joe Turner as expected by some of the audience but Joe Turner the pianist, described then, and as he was at the time of this recording in 1969 as, "The Greatest Living Stride Pianist."
No argument there. Some of the greatest piano playing I've ever heard - stride or otherwise.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Paul Edis Sextet @ Jazz Theatre, Ushaw Jazz Festival, Durham, Aug 25.

Paul Edis (piano), Graham Hardy (trumpet), Danny Barley (trombone), Graeme Wilson (saxophone, flute), Mick Shoulder (bass), Adam Sinclair (drums).
(Review by Steve T/Photo courtesy of Russell.)
I don't speak for Paul but I'm guessing, of all the bands he plays in, this is his flagship, so, appropriate for it to headline the first night.
A new selection taken from their two albums, both essential for anyone who follows north east jazz, with one track from Graeme Wilson’s Quartet album which is every bit as compelling.
They started with Administrate This, especially for anyone who's had an unpleasant experience with a parking ticket or something similar, which must be all of us.

CD Review: Fred Hersch - (open book)

Fred Hersch (piano)
(Review by Dave Brownlow)
(open book) is jazz piano-master Fred Hersch’s latest recording – his eleventh solo album – which finds him in a particularly reflective and lyrical mood. It is timed to coincide with the publishing of his memoir Good Things Happen Slowly: A Life In and Out of Jazz which reveals his meteoric rise in jazz and his recognition as one of the most individual and expressive artists of his generation.
The music was recorded in a Seoul, South Korea, concert hall on a Hamburg/Steinway grand piano and Fred utilises all the magnificent sonorities throughout.

Early Bird Band @ Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017 - August 25

James Metcalf (trumpet), Ben Lawrence (trumpet & piano), Ryan De Silva (baritone saxophone), Andrew Hedges (trombone), Matthew Downey (guitar), Philipp Grobe (piano),  Alex Shipsey (bass) & Hattie Steel (drums) + Paul Edis (tenor saxophone)
(Review/photos Russell).
The second annual Ushaw Jazz Festival opened early Friday evening with a one set performance from the Early Bird Band. Established by musician and educator Paul Edis a little over three years ago at Newcastle’s Lit & Phil Library, this young musicians’ Saturday morning workshop goes from strength to strength. One or two have already flown the nest ensconced at prestigious music schools, another is about to live the dream at Berklee, and others are set to follow in their footsteps.

Buenos Aires Comes To Newcastle Tango and Jazz Quartet @ The Globe

(Review/Photos by Debra M)
It’s a quiet, warm Sunday afternoon on Tyneside, and the sun gleams through the Globe windows onto rose topped tables. The room gradually fills with tango loving milongueros, catching up after the summer break, pairs taking to the floor to dance.
Tricia, one of the organisers of the weekly Milonga de los Domingos, has prepared a traditional recorded playlist, but the highlight of this afternoon’s milonga is the live set by the Tango & Jazz Quartet, playing the music of their home, Buenos Aires.   The audience listens and dances attentively, the variation in rhythm reflected in nuanced footwork, changes of stance, the dancers’ faces focused on the moment.  A pleasure to hear and a pleasure to watch.  After their set is finished, Horacio pops upstairs to the jam session & sits in on piano, to the delight of the regulars.

Monday, August 28, 2017

September at The Globe...

...promises a varied abundance of jazz - trad, gypsy, bop, free, contemporary, local, international - including some exciting young talent and some very experienced veterans.
Sunday 3 Sep, gypsy jazz with Andy Lawrenson Trio
Saturday 9 Sep, modern jazz piano from Fergus McCreadie Trio
Thursday 14 Sep, bop, blues & swing with Safe Sextet with Debra Milne
Sunday 17 Sep, New Orleans jazz with Emily Bacon's Good Time Gang
Saturday 23 Sep, contemporary/retro from Tobie Carpenter Organ Trio
Friday 29 Sep, free improvisation at KOAN 6

Jazz is just part of the extensive music offering at The Globe - there is also rock, folk, punk, blues, garage. Non-jazz highlights include singer songwriter Katie Mac on Thursday 21 Sep as part of her UK tour and the album launch by award-winning young folk band Pons Aelius on Friday 22 Sep.
Please check our website for the full programme at The Globe (including many non-jazz gigs).

Interview with Sam Braysher by Gail Tasker.















(BSH  are pleased to post this interview with saxist Sam Braysher by guest writer Gail Tasker. Braysher's duo album with pianist Michael Kanan was reviewed here on August 1 and is scheduled for release on Friday, Sept. 1. The album launch takes place at the Vortex in London on Sept. 13 - Lance - Photos courtesy of John Rogers)
Where are you from? Where did the enthusiasm for music, and jazz in particular, come from?
I grew up in Dereham, Norfolk. I started having recorder lessons when I was seven before moving onto the saxophone when I went to the local high school at 11. I'd wanted to play the saxophone from quite a young age, for some reason, but starting on the recorder was really helpful in terms of laying the groundwork for reading music and things like that. I think when you play the saxophone you tend to end up playing some more jazzy repertoire, and I always enjoyed improvising. I had a local piano teacher, Jonathan Dodd, who really got me into jazz and taught me a lot, and I also played in the Norwich Students' Jazz Orchestra. It was all quite a gradual process that led to me deciding to study jazz and try to do it as a career, although I didn't have much understanding of exactly what that would entail at that point.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Proms 2017: Swing No End - Radio 3, August 27

Whilst nothing was ever going to quite follow Thursday's Mingus Prom this afternoon's Swing No End made a pretty decent fist of it.
Hosted by Clare Teal with the big bands of Guy Barker and Winston Rollins as well as several guests it was an enjoyable mix of old and not [quite] so old war horses that, thanks to the adapted arrangements, were saved from the knackers yard and looked to be good for another 100 years.
I'm not going to give a blow by blow commentary - the material is too familiar for that - instead, I'll just add an occasional observation.

Saturday, August 26, 2017

And now - Mingus: The Movie! BBC 4 Prom 2017


(Review by Lance).
We'd heard it live on Radio 3 the previous night and knew what was coming - or did we? The audio experience was fantastic - the audio/video presentation simply out of this world. I doubt if the Royal Albert Hall has ever experienced a Prom quite like this one. At the back of the stage, the bust of Sir Henry Wood who founded the Proms back in 1895 looked slightly bemused although, it may be my imagination, but I swear that, come the finale, he had a twinkle in his eye.
How could he not? We all did. This was jazz, nay, music of the very highest order played by a precision orchestra under the baton of Jules Buckley. The soloists were less precise. They played with a wild, reckless abandon that belied their august surrounds.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Xylophone needed for Classic Jazz Party

Mike Durham's Classic Jazz Party are looking to hire/borrow a xylophone for ace US drumming and percussionist star, Josh Duffee, to play at the Jazz Party this October.  The instrument they require is one with a 3.5 octave range, and with resonators.  The instrument would be required from 25 to 29 October 2017 - and the event takes place at the Village Hotel, Newcastle upon Tyne.  If you can help, please contact Patti Durham at patti_durham1@btinternet.com, or 0191 2812935.

Preview: Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017

(Preview by Russell)
Today, at the start of the long August bank holiday weekend, the magnificent Ushaw estate once again plays host to the Ushaw Jazz Festival. Last year’s inaugural event proved beyond doubt that there is a demand for a major festival in County Durham. Jazz fans travelled from all four corners of Britain, with some making the journey from the European continent. This year’s programme is one of quality across three days starting today, Friday 25, to Sunday, August 27.
Director of Ushaw Jazz Festival 2017, Paul Edis, has assembled an array of talent beginning today with a performance by the Early Bird Band (6:00pm). In little more than two years, the development of this young ensemble of promising jazz musicians has been quite remarkable. To the credit of the individuals themselves one or two have already moved on to study at prestigious music schools, and this Ushaw appearance is your chance to check out the next generation.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

RIP John Abercrombie

One of the outstanding contemporary guitarists, John Abercrombie, passed away on Tuesday (August 22) age 72.
One of the mainstays of the ECM label, Abercrombie pushed the boundaries but rarely crossed them.
Jazz/Rock, fusion he could be tagged with any of the above labels whilst still maintaining his individuality.
BSH has reviewed several of his albums. The most recent one being Up and Coming of which our Hugh C wrote: The album as a whole has a laid-back, free-flowing groove engendered by Abercrombie's relaxed guitar style.  By his own admission, “I play less fast than I used to, less 'technical'”.
A fair assessment I'd say. Steve T, in a comment to that review, hinted that the guitar legend was having health problems. Steve's No. 1 son, Frances Tulip, took part in an Abercombie guitar master class.
The New York Times has posted an in depth obituary
Sadly missed.
Lance.

Mingus Lives!

If you're not listening already - listen now!. It's fantastic!
Tune in to Radio 3 or listen to the whole shebang here.
I'm already adding it to my Key Moments!
Wow! that was really something! Best Jazz at the Proms concert ever!
The good news is that you can watch it on BBC 4 tomorrow night (August 25) at 7:30pm. Better Git it in Your Soul!
Lance.
PS: Going down well with the promenaders too!

Key Moments 6

As a teenager, my interest in pop music morphed to R&B as I had liked The Stones prior to discovering Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley. I got to like folk, blues, and from there, discovered Jimmy Yancey and the great blues and boogie-woogie pianists. The eureka moment came when a workmate played me Oscar Peterson’s Night Train album. He also played me Mingus’ Blues & Roots. Both iconic albums.
I had played a little R&B on guitar but left off playing for quite a few years but once I heard George Barnes with the Ruby Braff Quartet I was totally hooked on his style and went out and bought a cheap [Gibson] 335 copy and started practising along with albums, especially those by Barnes.
I remember a magical session at The New Orleans Club, Forth Banks, Newcastle,  with the Zbigniew Namyslowski Quartet.  That one session blew me away and widened my tastes and curiosity about the music considerably.
Another wonderful session was at the Corner House, Whitley Bay – Warne Marsh/Lee Konitz Quintet with our own Dave Cliff.
Two all-time favourite albums, one instrumental, one vocal both played with a great depth of feeling:
Richie Kamuca Quartet – ‘Tis Autumn.
Rebecca Kilgore with Bobby Gordon’s Trio - Remembering Maxine.
Roly.

CD Review: Gary Peacock Trio - Tangents

Gary Peacock (bass); Marc Copland (piano); Joey Baron (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Two in a row from ECM! Things are looking up. Tangents is a less frantic album than the one by Vijay Iyer but, in its own way, equally compelling. Veteran bassist Peacock has such a full sound that the monotony that often plagues bass-led trios is avoided. Such is the resonance it could have been a horn player. Copland on piano and drummer Baron combine to make this a three-way split with each member holding equal shares.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Key Moments 5

I sometimes think I was born singing...it was all I remember as a child, brought on by the radio, then the 1940's films. By the time I was a young teenager, my Dad's influence as a first class guitarist directed me to jazz and all the great musicians. I would sit and listen to him for hours, practising his chords. He loved Laura and I’m Getting Sentimental Over You. My brothers all played too so we were a musical family. We still are, as both of my sons play guitars and live for their music. Above all though is our family passion for Django Reinhardt. My Brother Les is an authority on him. When Denys and I got together he introduced me to the genius of Stan Getz, and Here’s That Rainy Day was our song.
I have seen many of the greats, Ella, Frank, Stephane, Dankworth, Cleo, and most of the big touring bands of the 1950's. I frequently visit the Victoria Vaults and the Phoenix in York, both great jazz venues. Just when you think you have found your fave, along comes another, last week it was Sue Raney. Lance knows the number which never fails to deliver for me My One and Only Love!
If music be the food of love...play on!
Liz

CD Review: Vijay Iyer - Far From Over

Vijay Iyer (piano/Rhodes); Graham Haynes (cornet/flugel/electronics); Steve Lehman (alto); Mark Shim (tenor); Stephan Crump (bass); Tyshawn Storey (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Most of the BSH reviewers (myself included) tend to eye ECM releases with suspicion never quite sure what lies ahead for them (us) as they (we) press the play button. Justifiably so. Releases from the German label can sometimes be boring, sometimes the jazz content questionable and sometimes so far into the left field they're almost coming out the other side. However, when they get it right, they really do get it right and they get it right with this one.
How could they not? With multi Down Beat award winner, Iyer in the driving seat and on the piano stool, the dice couldn't have been better loaded in their favour.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

If I Were a Painter by Elftet
















(Review by Lance)
Elftet, an 11 piece led by 21-year-old vibist Jonny Mansfield are releasing an evocative video cover of a Norah Jones'  number sung by Ella Hohnen Ford. It compares well with the original and the artwork by Laura Armstrong is stunning too!

Monday, August 21, 2017

Jerry Lewis was Cute!

Yet another entertainer has left us. Following Bruce, Jerry Lewis has now gone. If you want to remember him at his best-and you are also a Count Basie fan - get on to YouTube and type in 'Jerry Lewis does "Cute"' or something similar. It's quite brilliant.
George Hetherington.

CD Review: Power of Peace by the Isley Brothers and Santana.

(Review by Steve T)
 Jazz is an ocean. Rock and roll is a swimming pool. I hang out on a lake. Carlos Santana, Guardian 2000.

(ST: For anybody who doesn't follow such things, when somebody like Carlos talks about rock and roll, he doesn't mean Elvis, Chuck and Little, but boy bands with guitars, generally British, and I'd stick them in a puddle.)

The album combines one of the greatest ever rock bands and one of the greatest ever soul bands, and to extend Carlos' metaphor once more, soul music is a well: it's deep, underground, hard to find, hard to get, but sustains life.
Santana has been very close to jazz throughout his almost half-century, and has played with Alice Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, Tony Williams, Alphonso Johnson, John McLaughlin and others.
Sadly, the album doesn't live up to its promise, but when you consider these bands peaked between the late sixties and early eighties, perhaps no great surprise.

Paul Edis Trio @ Blaydon Jazz Club - August 20

Paul Edis (piano), Andy Champion (double bass) & Russ Morgan (drums) + Francis Tulip (guitar)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Roly Veitch).

Hello. Is that London’s world-famous jazz club?
Yes. How can I help you?
I know it sold out weeks ago, but, do you have any returns for tonight’s concert?
You’re in luck. We’ve just had a pair of tickets returned to the box office.
Great! I’ll take them.
That’ll be £25 per ticket plus our usual exorbitant booking fee.
That’s fine, it’s worth it to hear the Paul Edis Trio!

Meanwhile, ‘up north’, Blaydon Jazz Club secured the booking of the Paul Edis Trio for a modest fee, and the Black Bull faithful turned out, willingly paying the modest admission charge, knowing they were in for a treat. The trio was in full rehearsal mode long before the audience arrived. New material was to be premiered here on Tyneside, London would have to wait.

Radio Jazz

Mingus at the Proms
(Ed. Apologies for the delay in posting this item from Russell!)
A live edition of Jazz Line-Up comes from George Heriot’s School, Edinburgh at five o’clock today (Saturday August 19). Performers include the Dime Notes, Gwyneth Herbert and the duo of Andy Sheppard and guitarist John Parricelli. Also on Radio 3, Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz (midnight) listens to a selection of Charles Mingus’ recordings. On Thursday of next week (August 24) live from the Royal Albert Hall there is a celebration of Mingus’ life and music with Jules Buckley and the Metropole Orkest and featured soloists Shabaka Hutchings, saxophones, Christian Scott, trumpet, and vocalist Kandace Springs. The broadcast begins at 7:30pm and, twenty-four hours later over on BBC 4, you can listen again and watch the pictures on BBC Proms 2017.
If you want more of Andy Sheppard be sure to tune in to Monday evening’s Jazz Now programme on Radio 3 (11:00pm). Soweto Kinch presents a concert set from the Dean Street Pizza Express Jazz Club featuring Sheppard in his long-standing trio with Carla Bley and Steve Swallow.    
Russell

Sunday, August 20, 2017

CD Review: Julian Costello Quartet - Transitions

Julian Costello (tenor/soprano); Maciek Pysz (guitars); Yuri Goloubev (bass); Adam Teixeira (drums).
(Review by Lance/Drawing by Alban Low).
Thoughtful and compelling, that was my first reaction upon hearing Waves, the opening track. Costello's long drawn out notes convey waves of sound - not to be confused with sheets of the same. His tone is well-rounded, the sound languorous, sonorous, punctuated by a couple of jaunty notes before returning to the serious business in hand. Globe favourite Pycz -  the quartet are there on October 7, put it in your diaries now! - adds his contribution and it's no mere '2 bits' worth. There's no break between Waves and Ducks and I thought the machine was playing tricks when track 2 flashed up.
No, Ducks it was and, although the same ponderous mood was retained, Costello became more expansive, flashing the notes around the way tenor players are expected to do.
Soprano unpacked for Corners - a short opus that revealed Costello's tone to be equally attractive on the higher pitched instrument. Again, no track break - this really is cutting corners.

Mads Mathias - Be sure to catch him.

It was back in 2012 when ace Danish singer, Mads Mathias, released his debut CD Free Falling. For some reason or other, it was 2015 before it got reviewed on BSH. If you read the review you will realise it was well worth the wait and that a new star had been born. Since then I've heard little of Mathias apart from replaying the album many times.
Well, the good news is that he's once more in our midst.
Next weekend he's at the Royal Albert Hall as part of the Clare Teal hosted Prom 2017 -- Swing No End. This is at 1500 hrs on August 27 (live Radio 3?) and televised on BBC Four on Sept. 1 (1930 hrs.)
However, there's a cast of thousands so I doubt if Mads will get more than a couple of numbers.
Fortunately, the great Dane is also appearing in the north (as seen by the south) with a return trip to Seven Arts in Leeds on September 21 and the following day (22) at Scarborough Jazz Festival.
If you've got your fare and just a trifle to spare then don't miss either.
He's also on YouTube.
Lance.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

RIP Sir Bruce Forsyth

The death of Sir Bruce Forsyth, yesterday (August 18), at the age of 89 prompted me to recall that, among his many talents was that of jazz pianist which I think is sufficient for him to earn a mention here. Maybe Brucie wasn't in the Dudley Moore class but, nevertheless. he was a more than competent player as demonstrated in this YouTube clip.
Rest In Peace Sir Bruce, they don't make 'em like you anymore!
Obituary.
Lance.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Make a Rendezvous at Durham Cathedral on Saturday night

The Friends of Durham Cathedral have asked me to promote to regular attendees of the Lit & Phil Lunchtime Jazz Concerts the following concert at the Cathedral next Saturday evening, which I am of course more than pleased to do. Details (and Paul Bream’s Jazz Alert write-up) below - and for all of us, whether North East residents or just citizens of the world, a very worthy cause. 
For those with long(er) memories, it is a welcome return - after Stan Tracey's Ellington Sacred Concerts in the nineties - of jazz and gospel to the Cathedral. It sounds like it will be a truly memorable evening. Please come and make it also a successful one for the Cathedral Friends.
Brian Ebbatson

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Key Moments 4

(By Russell).
The first four LPs borrowed from a local record lending library; Be Bop Preservation Society Be Bop Preservation Society (with colourful zoot suits on the LP cover), Billie Holiday Songs for Distingué Lovers, Miles Davis Bitches Brew (a starting point, working back over to the Birth of the Cool era), Quintette du Hot Club de France Swing ’35-’39.
Michael Parkinson’s late night chat show. Parky, a life-long jazz fan, had a front row seat as jazz greats performed a tune or two in the studio; Oscar, Ella, Joe Pass, Dudley Moore. Yes, little Dud, a seriously good pianist, Errol Garner a favourite. Errol who? Must check him out.

Book Review: Trevor Barre - Convergences, Divergences & Affinities (Compass Publishing 2017)

Not being over-familiar with the genre, free improvisation, it would be unfair of me to pass judgement on this well-written and equally well-researched historical treatise. Nevertheless, before moving on to the Press Release, I will make a few observations. Steve Beresford claims that Free Improv. is not jazz...some of it sounds like jazz but they're not playing it. This equates with what Charlie Parker said about Bebop, that it's not jazz. This has, forever, been the problem with any new art form and music in particular. The listener judges the 'new thing' using the values of its predecessor. Neither better nor worse, the key word is 'different'.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Matt MacKellar Trio with Julija Jacenaite @ Empty Shop - August 13

Joel Brown (keyboards), Paul Grainger (double bass) & Matt MacKellar (drums) with Julija Jacenaite (vocals)
(Review by Russell)
A mid-August late Sunday afternoon gig at Durham’s Empty Shop. Would anyone show up? The first floor speakeasy with its paint-splattered mix and match tables and chairs, floorboards and a minimalist lighting rig, slowly but surely filled up with a mix and match audience of regulars, jazz musicians (established and emerging) and first time visitors. The band, fronted by vocalist Julija Jacenaite, made a first visit to Durham, and in so doing said farewell to a young man destined to perform at the world’s great jazz venues.

Key Moments 3

(By Ann Alex)
I didn’t come into jazz until after the age of 50 or so. Making me a very late entrant, which I regret.
Childhood age 7 to 11 - Heard loads of the jazz standards on the radio, picked up lots of the lyrics but didn’t like the songs much, nor did I understand the love songs. I did enjoy Hard Hearted Hannah as I loved the image of her ‘pouring water on a drowning man’. Children are cruel!  
Teenage years – liked listening to Brubeck’s Take 5, Kenny Ball and Acker Bilk. Considered Ella Fitzgerald to be a ‘good singer’, but, really, preferred classical singers.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Preview: Indigo Jazz Voices @ The Globe: August 17

 Don’t miss the chance to hear these singers at their latest gig this coming Thursday 17.
Jen Errington, Jenny Lingham, Carrie McCullock, Barry Keatings and newcomer Indigo singer Miriam McCormick will all be performing individually, five very different voices, five unique talents.
You’ll be able to listen to classic songs such as I’ve Got You under My Skin; Blue Moon; Angel Eyes;
Come Rain Or Come Shine; and You’ve Changed.
The vocalists will be accompanied by fine musicians Alan Law on piano and Katy Trigger on bass, with Ron Pattinson on piano for Barry’s vocals. It’s a 7.30pm start, and £5 admission – well worth the money.
Ann Alex

CD Review: Tom Millar Quartet - Unnatural Events

Tom Millar (piano); Alex Munk (guitar/electric sitar on title track)); Misha Mullov-Abbado (bass); Mike Clowes (drums) + Alice Zawadski (voice on 2 tracks)
(Review by Lance).
Millar, born in Sydney, raised in London, read music at Cambridge, graduated with a master's from RAM and studied with Django Bates in Switzerland before recording this, his debut CD, in Wales. Not a man to let the grass grow under his feet! Fortunately, this, seemingly perpetual motion, is reflected in his playing and in his compositions which are all inspired by people and places that have been important to him.
Azura Days has Millar and MM-A providing extra rhythm behind Munk by way of some egg shaking. Clowes thumps the tubs behind Millar's solo and the whole is suggestive of JSB after a few Brandenburgs and Kronenbourgs although, in actual fact, it was inspired by a trip around the Mediterranean.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Francis Tulip Quartet (aka Tulip Connection) @ Bar Tutsters, Bishop Auckland, August 10.

Francis Tulip (guitar), Joel Brown (keys), Michael Dunlop (bass), Matthew MacKellar (drums).
(Review by Steve T.)
The young lions of North East Jazz continue their triumphant run towards world domination. With less than a week to promote, the hordes were never going to turn out on a Thursday night in Bishop Auckland. Nevertheless, it was still pretty busy, including some local music luminaries and some local young musicians threatening to put their instruments on eBay.
Tutsters’ landlord, Mick McPherson, has tried his hand at Jazz before with a Tuesday night jam session featuring banjos, cornets, clarinets and, on occasion, a certain guitarist, so all credit to him for having a go.
Much of the Monk stuff featured at the Globe was stepped aside to make way for Wayne and Trane which the guitarist plans to feature with his Birmingham Conservatoire Quartet at Ushaw Jazz Festival in a couple of weeks’ time.

Me Tarzan, you Jane, he’s Joel Brown

The 2017 Whitley Bay Film Festival is working in partnership with the Tyne Theatre and Opera House to celebrate ‘The Cinema Years’ of the listed former cinema on Westgate Road. A Stoll cinema for more than fifty years up until 1974, many blockbusters were screened with queues snaking around the block such was its popularity with film goers. Now, over three days, cinema buffs are rolling up to the Tyne Theatre to watch films originally screened way back when, view exhibition material, participate in workshops and partake of a ‘dainty tea’ as was the custom.
Friday’s opening event presented Tarzan of the Apes (Dir. Scott Sidney, 1918). Black and white, silent, with live piano accompaniment. Our pianist? Joel Tofield Brown. Yes, the very same Joel   Brown who has made a big impression at the Jazz Café’s regular jam sessions! Tarzan, played by
Elmo Lincoln, could never have imagined piano accompaniment like this! Joel, at seventeen, played it his way…jazz piano all the way. Improvising to the moving image, Joel’s interpretation of the on-screen action maintained audience interest throughout. One hour’s worth of piano, the concentration required no doubt a real challenge, Joel Brown did a grand job. Oh, yeah…Tarzan got his girl. 
Russell.

Stu Collingwood Trio @ The Globe August 10

Mo Scott (vocals) Stu Collingwood (organ); Lloyd Howell (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex/Photo from Jazz Coop archive)
This was advertised as a duo, but Mo came along as well, I’m pleased to say. I encountered Mo many years ago as a blues singer but she’s always been familiar with standard jazz songs, and she excelled with the Gasbook last night, giving a rather more raunchy style of interpretation than is usual. Stu explained to me that his organ/keyboard needed only a light touch to play multiple notes very fast, but maybe he was being modest as his fingers flew over the keys and chords like forked lightning, and his feet danced on the pedals, entrancing to watch. And the drummer held all the rhythms together like the master that he is.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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