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Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

John Postgate: "Oscar Peterson played a good solo in 1954..." - (Jazz Monthly August 1960)

Bill Evans: "A composer writes something, and an orchestra interprets it--he spends maybe six months writing 10 minutes of music, but a jazz musician spends 10 minutes of playing 10 minutes of music, and he performs it himself". - (Jazz Monthly July1960).

Archives

Today Friday October 20

Afternoon
Rendezvous Jazz - The Monkseaton Arms, Front St., Monkseaton, Whitley Bay NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.

Hand to Mouth: Lindsay Hannon & Bradley Johnston - Bishop Auckland Town Hall. 1:00pm. £5.00.

Vasilis Xenopoulos & Paul Edis - Lit & Phil, 23 Westgate Rd., Newcastle NE1 1SE. 1:00pm. £5.00.

Evening
Julija Jacenaite & Alan Law - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 9pm. Free.

King Bees - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

Vasilis Xenopoulos & Nigel Price w Paul Edis Trio - Traveller’s Rest, West Auckland Road, Cockerton, Darlington. DL3 9ER. 8:30pm. £10.00. Opus 4.

Hot 8 Brass Band - Northumbria Students’ Union, Sandyford Road, Newcastle NE1 8SB. Tel: 0191 227 4757 (SU enquiries). 7:30pm. £20.35.

Twin Beam - Hidden Heights Creative Studio, Brandling Street, Gateshead NE8 2BA. 6:30pm. Tickets: £5.00. in advance from Arch 16 Café (next to High Level Bridge). An Oxjam Gateshead Bridges Quarter event. Multi bill, multi venue.

Beth Macari - Prohibition Bar, Brandling Street, Gateshead NE8 2BA. 6:30pm. Tickets: £5.00. in advance from Arch 16 Café (next to High Level Bridge). An Oxjam Gateshead Bridges Quarter event. Multi bill, multi venue.

Sting - Bamburgh Castle. 7:15pm. Tickets: £250.00. & £150.00. Acoustic. Charity gig.

Steve Bone - Al Forno, 81 Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. 7pm.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Key Moments 2


Following on from David Brownlow's Key Moments, here are a few of mine...
At the Jazz Band Ball by Muggsy Spanier and Intermission Riff by Stan Kenton hit me simultaneously which was all wrong.  Back then it had to be either one or the other. If you liked Dixieland then you turned your nose up at Progressive Jazz and vice versa. Likewise, if you went for the Bunk Johnson/George Lewis brand of New Orleans it was heresy to even mention Bird or Diz in the same breath. Today there are still pragmatists in both camps who maintain this tunnelled vison approach.
Birth of the Blues by Frank Sinatra. One of his last recordings for Columbia before moving over to Capital and those classic long-players: Wee Small Hours, Swingin’ Lovers, Swingin’ Affair etc. Birth of the Blues was important inasmuch as it removed Guy Mitchell, Eddie Fisher, Johnny Ray from my record shelves. The B (flip) side, Why Try to Change me Now?, remains the benchmark for ballad singing.
Hearing the Emcee Five at The Downbeat in Newcastle; Jimmy Miller playing great piano at a pub in Blaydon; Sunday mornings at The Bluebell in Felling, The University Theatre, in Newcastle, The City Vaults down the Bigg Market; The Tally Ho in Kentish Town.
Playing with the Newcastle Big Band at the San Sebastian Jazz Festival.
The characters: Jurich who ran the New Orleans Club, Andy Hudson, who ran the aforementioned big band, Brian Fisher who fell asleep at the piano whilst playing a Glenn Miller number with the band, and Keith Crombie – a Newcastle legend. I’d known of Crombie for years, even before he took over the original Jazz Café but had steered clear of him due to the picture of him painted by The Establishment. The Establishment and Crombie were natural enemies. However, when I did get to know him I found that beneath that gruff exterior there was an even gruffer interior – until he got to know you and decided you weren’t going to stab him in the back. Knowledgeable and opinionated on just about everything he’d listen to your argument, nod as if in agreement then dismiss it with words you wouldn’t find in The War Cry. The procession through the streets of Newcastle on the day of his funeral was akin to the passing of the wearer of a NUFC number 9 shirt.
Listening to Roland Kirk in concert at a Durham college; Guy Lafitte, Bob Wilber & Warren Vaché at Breda Jazz Festival; Art Pepper at the University Theatre; Carol Kidd at a pub in Edinburgh; Meeting Daryl Sherman at North Shields; meeting Eric Delaney at South Shields – the list is endless.
Let’s have your lists…
Lance.
PS: Not forgetting working with Ronnie McLean and Hughie Aitchison at J.G.Windows Music Store.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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