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Bebop Spoken There

Peter Vacher: “The Hopbine [public house] is a Tesco Express now, having been reinvented successively as Desi Dons, Bootsy Brogans, the Dog and Duck and, before that, the Chequered Flag.” – (Jazzwise October 2017)

Kyle Eastwood: “Naturally I listened to pop music when I was a kid – I’d spend two hours a day hearing it on the school bus! – but the very first music I heard in the house and the first concerts I went to were jazz.” – (Jazzwise October 2017)

Archives

Today Sunday October 22

Afternoon.
More Jam - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 3:00pm. Free.

Gerry Richardson's Big Idea - Hoochie Coochie, 54 Pilgrim St., Newcastle NE1 6SF. 5:00pm. FREE!

Blues @ The Bay - Tanner Smith's, 17-19 South Parade, Whitley Bay NE26 2RE, 0191 2525941. 4pm. Blues Jam w. Scott Wall & Charlie Philp.

Musicians Unlimited - Park Hotel, Park Rd., Hartlepool TS26 9HU. 01249 233126.1pm. Free.

Somethin' Blue - Vesuvio, 3a Houndgate, Darlington DL1 5RL. 01325 788564. 5pm. Weekly.
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Evening

Vasilis Xenopoulos & Nigel Price w Paul Edis Trio - Black Bull, Bridge St., Blaydon NE21 4JJ. 8:00pm. £10.

Smokin' Mat Partner - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

Groove-a-matics - Sour Grapes, Newgate Street, Morpeth NE61 1BU. Tel: 01670 519069. 8:30pm. Free. Johnny Whitehill, Mick Cantwell…none better!

Jazz Jam - Empty Shop, 35c Framwellgate Bridge, Durham DH1 3NJ. 7:30pm. Free.

Body and Soul - Quakerhouse, Mechanics’ Yard, Darlington DL3 7QF. 6:00pm. £5.00. Line-up: Richie Emmerson (tenor), Kevin Eland (trumpet & flugelhorn), Rick Laughlin (keys), Phil Laughlin (bass) & Stuie Ellerton (drums).

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Hepscott Village Hall, Morpeth NE61 6LN. 8:45pm. £10 (includes pie 'n' peas supper).

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, March 02, 2017

Guitarist goes it alone in Eyemouth

(By Rob Adams)
Scottish guitarist Nigel Clark plays a rare solo gig back in his home country when he appears at Eyemouth Hippodrome, just north of the Bebop Spoken Here heartlands on Saturday, March 11.
Currently based in Dublin, Clark spends much of his time these days touring with Dutch violinist Tim Kliphuis’s trio and has just released an album, Confetti Falling in the Rain, with the Irish singer Colette Cassidy.
“I really enjoy working with Tim and Colette but there’s something I particularly like about being alone with an audience,” says Clark who began playing professionally at the age of eighteen and played with 1980s chart-toppers Hue & Cry and soul singer Gloria Gaynor before following his hero, John McLaughlin into jazz and jazz-rock.

“The stories behind the tunes in the jazz repertoire are often almost as compelling as the melodies and harmonies that shape them and it’s much easier to share anecdotes from the stage when you don’t have two or three other musicians kicking their heels, waiting for you to shut up and play!”
From gigs with his own band, which included saxophonist Tim Garland and pianist Brian Kellock, Clark went on to accompany singer Carol Kidd and after signing with New York label Arkadia Records he found himself playing guitar festivals in a band comprising eleven of Europe’s top players including Jan Akkerman, Terje Rypdal and Wolfgang Muthspiel.
It was with his first album for Arkadia, Grand Hotel Europa, that Clark made the permanent switch from electric to acoustic nylon strung guitar, finding the latter a more personal means of expressing himself. He subsequently formed a duo with Belgian guitar legend Philip Catherine and when, in 2007, Tim Kliphuis was looking to move beyond the “Dutch Stephane Grappelli” description that had helped to establish him, he found Clark’s readiness to play anything from a Scottish traditional tune to the Mahavishnu Orchestra’s The Dance of Maya an inspiration.
Clark recorded a solo album, Under the Stars, in 2012 and its arrangements of standards such as Body & Soul and All the Things You Are form the basis of his set list.
“I include one or two rock and pop songs, Santana’s Samba Pa Ti and maybe a Beatles song or two, because I like playing them but also because audiences might not always be familiar with other tunes I play, like Joe Pass’s Paco de Lucia, for example, and they can help to break the ice.”

Rob Adams.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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