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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Gelly: “From 1 January 1920, when prohibition was imposed in the US, people didn’t stop drinking, they just stopped drinking legally.” – (Jazz Journal October 2017).

Regina Carter: “When I was a teenager, I would daydream about going out on a date and dancing to Ella’s music.” (Down Beat October 2017).

Today Monday November 20

Afternoon

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 NE30 4QS. 1:00pm. Free.

Classic Swing - Marquis of Granby, Streetgate, Sunniside NE16 5ES. Tel: 0191 488 0954. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Soundbone plays Led Zep @ Jazz Café. September 25

Chris Grieve (trombone & electronics), Graeme Stephen (guitar & loops) & David Carnegie (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Mike Tilley).
This was fun. A legendary rock band repackaged as a ‘jazz trio’. Led Zeppelin tapped into the National Grid to generate a trillion watts through Marshall stacks, Soundbone created a big sound of their own filtering trombone and guitar through a box of tricks.  Newcastle City Hall veterans were largely absent from the Jazz Café, oblivious to the goings on in the upstairs room, perhaps sitting at home with a curry listening to Black Dog, bemoaning the fact that things ain’t what they used to be.
Black Dog opened the show – you could have been here! – and the trio pulled it off! A seated Graeme Stephen carved out the Jimmy Page riff, Chris Grieve’s clip-mic ‘bone pulsatingly melodic, drummer David Carnegie dead-on, sub-Bonham sledgehammer.
Stephen and Grieve, two thirds NeWt (the band, not p***** as), recently joined forces with Barbadian, ex-Tyneside resident, David Carnegie to play the Zeppelin ‘songbook’ and it really does work. Moby Dick featured DC’s explosive drumming, Misty Mountain Hop surfaced from a looping swirl of sound and Communication Breakdown lacked one thing, and one thing only, Robert Plant’s inimitable rock god vocals.
Immigrant Song, the folkie Going to California, the charts-reading Soundbone trio had what we already knew – immense chops. The affable Grieve suggested singing along to the tunes was in order – the chances were the audience had beaten him to it. To close a thoroughly entertaining evening Soundbone stretched out on Kashmir; Graeme Stephen developed a brilliant solo, Grieve sang into his now detached mic and Carnegie drove a tight trio to the final stop chord.  
Russell.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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