Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Vadim Neselovskyi, Professor of Jazz Piano, Berklee College of Music: “Every pianist has to deal with a very complex left-hand part at some point. This is the essential pianistic experience – to split your brain into two halves and execute two very different tasks at the same time.” – (Down Beat September 2017).

Roscoe Mitchell: “To me, improvisation is trying to improve your skills so you can make these on-point compositional decisions. That takes practice.” – (Down Beat September 2017)

Archives

Today Saturday September 23

Scarborough Jazz Festival - Day two of three.
-----
Evening
Bradley Johnston (solo guitar) - Cherry Tree, 9 Osborne Rd., Jesmond, Newcastle NE2 2AE. 7:30pm. No cover charge.
Rockafellas - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.
Tobie Carpenter Organ Trio - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8pm. £10.
Thin Man + Jon Gordon - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8pm. Free.
-----
Nikki Iles & Stan Sulzmann - Great Hall, Hexham Abbey, Hexham NE46 3NB. 10pm. £10/£8.
Pat McMahon Trio - Tannery, Gilesgate, Hexham NE46 3QD. 01434 605537. 9pm. Free.
-----
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Dave Newton & Dean Stockdale @ The Globe Jazz Bar - March 15.









Dave Newton & Dean Stockdale (keys).
(Review by Lance/Photo courtesy of Ken Drew)
The number 22 bus takes you practically to the door of The Globe so it was but a short hop from Havana à la Hoochie into the unknown - the unknown being whether a two piano set, even one by two such formidable performers as Dave and Dean, would pull the punters.
The downstairs bar was doing good business with concertgoers seeking refreshment prior to an evening of Spandau Ballet at the Arena.
Upstairs too was near to standing room only as the audience slaked their thirst in eager anticipation.
We weren't disappointed.
A long reflective intro saw both players feeding off each other before stomping into Lady be Good.
This "Lady" wasn't just "Good" she was "Sensational"! Likewise Miss Jones. Jobim's Triste, St Thomas, Over the Rainbow and Cheek to Cheek were other twenty fingered outings that pleased, as did a solo slot for Dean On the Sunny Side of the Street.
During the break Dean revealed he'd taken lessons from Dave some years ago and it showed inasmuch as, despite their differing styles they were, nevertheless, very compatible.
The second round - sorry, I mean set - opened with the ever delightful Alice in Wonderland followed by a rolling stock blues boogie. Was it Pinetop, Meade Lux, Johnson or Yancey? No, it was John Clayton's Blues For Stephanie - it rocked the room.
Like Someone in Love, four handed stride on Tea For Two, My Romance (or was it Here's That Rainy Day?) had Dave not only flying solo but also pressing the guitar button on the Clavinova to the effect that by closing your eyes he really was playing guitar!
On Green Dolphin St and some fun with Rhythm changes then it was all over.
Or was it?
Of course it wasn't!
An audience member stood up and shouted (she really did) "Play Misty For me!"
Well even though Clint Eastwood wasn't around they did.
A fitting end to a rather wonderful day.
Lance.

11 comments :

  1. Such as shame that two such gifted musicians couldn't find a tune less than 50 years old to play.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank goodness two such gifted musicians didn't find a tune less than 50 years old to play!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Not keen on that band either although Robbie has penned a couple of decent numbers

    ReplyDelete
  4. Being domiciled in France, I obviously didn't catch the two piano concert at the Globe but I am amazed that anyone could find fault with the programme which was certainly taken from that treasure trove, the GREAT AMERICAN SONG BOOK. There were tens of thousands of beautifully constructed songs written during this period (1920--50) which allow inventive jazz musicians to improvise in a harmonic or modal fashion. Any pianist worth his salt will have hundreds of these firmly implanted in his head, to be produced & reconstructed at the drop of a hat. I am not familiar with Dean's work but I do know that Dave is a great devotee of TGASB, as I once had to do an unrehearsed two piano set with him at the Bude JF which was great fun, although I was hanging on to his coat tails most of the time but Hey, who isn't? I have always felt that a concert of this nature should contain material that the audience, in the main, will recognise & to avoid including obscure or one's own pretentious compositions. Obviously Dave & Dean didn't think that anything from outside of the TGAB was worthy of inclusion in their programme & who am I to argue with that? In any case it would allow them to select their proramme with virtually little or no rehearsal needed. Anyway how do you find good songs since the 60s as the art of good song writing died with the advent of Rock & Roll & Andrew Lloyd Webber.

    ReplyDelete
  5. My sentiments exactly Bill - Long Live the GASbook!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I am amazed that someone who didn't actually attend the concert can pass comment on it's content given that you can't possibly now how the pieces were actually perfomed(as it happened they were performed with great panache) if you honestly think that there has been no decent original music composed since 1960 then with all due respect you opinion is meaningless. I have no problem with standards especially if performed in a creative and original way but as a jazz fan I particularly enjoy the new and unexpected. Having said that the vast majority of the audience seem to agree with you - so what do I know?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Explaining recently why he had decided to do an album of Great American Songbook numbers associated with Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan said: 'I don't see myself as covering these songs in anyway. They've been covered enough. Buried, as a matter of a fact. What me and my band are basically doing is uncovering them. Lifting them out of the grave and bringing them into the light of day.'

    ReplyDelete
  8. Buried! never! and as for lifting them out of the grave, sorry Bob Dylan, they have never been out of the light of day, and yes I agree with Bill Harper, there has been no good song writing since the 60's. Lloyd Webber's stuff is repetitive and boring. GASbook will live forever, recorded by all the greats, and appreciated by anyone who understands a wonderful lyric and arrangement

    ReplyDelete
  9. Proof of the gasbook's durability lies in the number of artists who approach, shall we say The September of Their Years? suddenly discover the legacy of music they have chosen to ignore in their glory days - it's akin to seeking "the grey vote". Dylan may well be sincere - I have yet to hear the album - just as, I'm sure, Rod Stewart, Robbie Williams, Westlife and others were before him but...
    Tony Bennett summed it [the sixties] up when he said, "All of a sudden you had to write your own songs as if Kern and Porter weren't good enough!"

    ReplyDelete

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Subscribe!