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Bebop Spoken There

Howard Roberts: "The guitar is caught right in the thick part of the piano keyboard, right in the register where pianists do most of their work, and, boy, it gets like a can of worms in there if you're both not careful." - (Down Beat June 29, 1966).

Simon Allen: “I started saxophone at secondary school when I was 12 and got to Grade 8 when I was about 15.” – (Jazzwise February 2014).

Bebop Spoken There Archives.

Today Friday July 25.

Afternoon.
RENDEZVOUS JAZZ - Black Horse, Monkseaton. 1pm. Free.
Classic jazz.
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Evening.
SHOESHOP QUARTET - Sunderland International Air Show, Cliffe Park, Whitburn Rd., Sunderland SR6 9NS. Free. 6.30pm.
Barbershop quartet with Ruth Lambert.
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THOMAS BROWN AFFAIR - Hoochie Coochie, 54 Pilgrim St., Newcastle NE1 6SF. £17. 9pm (on stage).
Fantastic pairing of Thomas Brown and Kenny Thomas. Find out more.
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ALT - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 9pm. £5/£3 (before 8.30pm.).
AKA Alan Law Trio. More great piano jazz at The Caff.

Saturday, June 09, 2012

John Hallam with the Paul Edis Trio @ Blaydon Jazz Club.June 7.

John Hallam (tenor & baritone saxophones, clarinet), Paul Edis (piano), Mick Shoulder (double bass) & Adam Sinclair (drums).
(Review by Russell).
The forecast storm clouds gathered overhead during the journey from Newcastle to Blaydon. They did little to dampen the enthusiasm for a much anticipated gig. A return visit by reeds virtuoso John Hallam working in the company of the Paul Edis Trio enticed a good number of folk to Blaydon & District Club and Institute.


Hallam, an assured player on clarinet, tenor and baritone saxophones, chose a well-balanced programme and opened on tenor with a leisurely Just Friends. Mick Shoulder (double bass) shone on Love Me or Leave Me and the trio – make that the quartet – hit the heights on Blues in the Closet. Hallam switched to clarinet for a couple of numbers before leaving the stage to Edis, Shoulder and drummer Adam Sinclair to deliver a sensitive reading of Stella by Starlight
Hallam picked-up the baritone to further demonstrate his command of the reeds with a brisk Dream a Little Dream Of Me and closed the first set with the Duke Ellington/Mercer Ellington/Don George Time’s A Wastin’. The consensus of opinion during the interval was that it had been an excellent first set with much praise for the local lads. Tyneside has an enviable history of first class rhythm sections working as the support to visiting guest musicians from Britain, America and further afield. The Paul Edis Trio – Edis piano, Mick Shoulder (double bass) and Adam Sinclair (drums) –  is right up there with the best of them. 
The music resumed with What is This Thing Called Love? and Hallam, on tenor, continued to offer generous solo opportunities to the trio. Edis responded with yet another brilliant solo and a round of fours spotlighted the exuberant Sinclair. The trio took in their collective stride a bossa intro on Out of Nowhere followed by - a highlight amongst highlights - Bernie’s Tune. Hallam, once more on baritone, was, surely, delighted by the high level playing of all on the stand. Benny Carter’s When Lights Are Low revealed Sinclair’s immaculate brush work and Edis’ sublime solo incorporated fleeting references to other GAS book gems; was that Surrey with the Fringe on Top? Hallam the clarinetist played it near-hot on Irving Berlin’s Puttin’ on the Ritz, drummer Sinclair somehow evoked Fred Astaire’s unsurpassed tap dancing routine and Shoulder anchored it. Review notes said, simply, PERFECT!. Say no more. 
The Edis Trio slowed the pulse rate with a measured Body and Soul before John Hallam (on tenor) called time with Apple Honey. Blaydon Jazz Club is the place to be if first rate mainstream jazz is your thing. John Hallam’s visit was made possible thanks to Gateshead Council supporting the event during Blaydon Races Festival week and of course the regular supporters turning-up in good numbers. Next month  - Thursday July 5 – get along to hear master guitarist James Birkett and reeds virtuoso Graeme Wilson working in quintet format. It starts a little earlier than usual – get there by 8:15 pm. Make the effort – ample parking space in the car park on Garden Street, late buses to Gateshead and Newcastle, excellent bottled beers and a warm welcome at Blaydon Jazz Club ensure you won’t be disappointed.
Russell 

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Alternatively, email me - lanceliddle@gmail.com.

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
PS:I don't care what your political views are - you can love or hate Cameron, Clegg, Milliband, Farage, Genghis Khan or Julius Caesar - just don't air them here!
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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