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Bebop Spoken There

Mundell Lowe: “...we also had to play for a floor show, which consisted of girls dancing--some of 'em were dressed, some of 'em were not so dressed.” – (Crescendo September 1974).

Terell Stafford: “I came to jazz very late, in my second year of graduate school at Rutgers University. I thought pursuing it would make me a better classical trumpet player.” – (Jazz Times October 2015).

Today Monday November 30

Jazz in the Afternoon - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
Pocket Jazz Orchestra - Pizza Express, Dean St., Newcastle NE1 1PG. 8pm. No cover charge.
Blue Jazz Voices - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:00pm.

Thursday, November 26, 2009

More on Sonny Rollins at the Barbican.

(This comment, I decided is worthy of a seperate posting - Lance.)
We endorse everything said about the Mark Toomey Quartet at the Cherry Tree. A wonderful evening of jazz and a credit to the local jazz scene.
With reference to the Sonny Rollins Concert at the Barbican, which we and the family had the privilege of being there, it was the best jazz concert I have ever been to, for many reasons.
"The living embodiment of a great tradition" was Geoffrey Smith's description as he welcomed the band to the stage. How many musicians get a standing ovation before they actually get onto the stage, and at 79 years old give a performance with such enthusiasm and most of all, the creativity, was something to be seen (and heard of course)?
The fullness of his tone was all there and the band with him was first/world class. Bob Cranshaw on bass, Clifton Anderson on trombone, Bobby Broom on Guitar, a percussionist called Victor.Y.See Yuen, and a sensational drummer in Kobie Watkins; all having a ball and thoroughly enjoying backing the great Sonny Rollins.
Having said that, Sonny was very gracious and featured all of them throughout the concert, having the great respect for each other reciprocated, not allowing ego's to get in the way of what was great music.
Some of the tunes played were 'Someday I'll find you'', "They say that falling in love is wonderful", "St.Thomas" and of course "Don't stop the carnival", every tune being fully explored and no stone unturned (in improvisational terms), before Sonny would take it out.
He played one set lasting approximately 90 minutes finishing with the aforementioned 'Don't stop the Carnival' and again receiving his second standing ovation of the night lasting many minutes but returned only to give a wave to the standing adulating audiance.
Following that, you felt that the audience almost danced out of the Barbican with huge smiles on their faces with the haunting melody of 'Don't stop the Carnival' still ringing in their heads, knowing that they had all seen and witnessed one of the worlds greatest musicians still playing at a level beyond comprehension. Long may the 'Carnival' continue, and we hope Sonny Rollins continues to give the world so much pleasure listening to the sound of genius improvising tenor saxophone.
Ron Ainsborough.
(Photo courtesy of Derek Cogger).


  1. Here's my review- it was a great evening

  2. Great reviews and a pleasure to read about the enthusiastic experiences.....and although I wasn't there, I'm sure the whole repertoire was full of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic content - which really is what "music" is all about.

    Unlike some of the claptrap that is bandied about as "jazz" these days.

  3. Sonny Rollins Roadshows.
    Vol.1 was great, I've nearly caused a few traffic accidents blasting this out.January 2012 Jazz Journal has a review of Vol.2 just out (almost as good)but for those of us in straitened circs. during the long hard con/dem winter this new issue is immediately available on Spotify for nowt. It'll bring a tear to the throat and a lump to the eye. Go on traddies broaden your horizons!


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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.

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